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Article: Would relaxing speed limits aggravate safety?: A case study of Hong Kong

TitleWould relaxing speed limits aggravate safety?: A case study of Hong Kong
Authors
KeywordsAccident counts
Before and after study
Comparison group
Road safety
Speed limit
Treatment group
Issue Date2005
PublisherElsevier Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/336/description#description
Citation
Accident Analysis and Prevention, 2005, v. 37 n. 2, p. 377-388 How to Cite?
AbstractThis paper studies the effect of the changed speed limits on accident counts for major roadways in the urban environment of Hong Kong. In 1999-2002, the speed limits of a number of sections of roadway were reviewed and increased. Nineteen of them were major roadways. Their speed limits were raised by 10-20 km/h from 50 to 70 km/h. Before and after studies were carried out to investigate the changes in accident counts with respect to the set of carefully chosen comparison groups. Qualification tests for these comparison groups were conducted to confirm their suitability for the studies. In the majority of the treatment sites, the accident counts were worse after the increase in speed limits, both for the category of fatal, serious and slight (FSS) accidents, and for the category of fatal and serious (FS) accidents. Overall, the relaxation of the speed limit from 50 to 70 km/h increased the FSS accident counts by 15% and the FS accident counts by 1%. The relaxation of the speed limit from 70 to 80 km/h increased the FSS accident counts by 18% and the FS accident counts by 36%. © 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/150266
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.07
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.109
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, SCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSze, NNen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLo, HKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHung, WTen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLoo, BPYen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:02:53Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:02:53Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAccident Analysis and Prevention, 2005, v. 37 n. 2, p. 377-388en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0001-4575en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/150266-
dc.description.abstractThis paper studies the effect of the changed speed limits on accident counts for major roadways in the urban environment of Hong Kong. In 1999-2002, the speed limits of a number of sections of roadway were reviewed and increased. Nineteen of them were major roadways. Their speed limits were raised by 10-20 km/h from 50 to 70 km/h. Before and after studies were carried out to investigate the changes in accident counts with respect to the set of carefully chosen comparison groups. Qualification tests for these comparison groups were conducted to confirm their suitability for the studies. In the majority of the treatment sites, the accident counts were worse after the increase in speed limits, both for the category of fatal, serious and slight (FSS) accidents, and for the category of fatal and serious (FS) accidents. Overall, the relaxation of the speed limit from 50 to 70 km/h increased the FSS accident counts by 15% and the FS accident counts by 1%. The relaxation of the speed limit from 70 to 80 km/h increased the FSS accident counts by 18% and the FS accident counts by 36%. © 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/336/description#descriptionen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAccident Analysis and Preventionen_HK
dc.subjectAccident countsen_HK
dc.subjectBefore and after studyen_HK
dc.subjectComparison groupen_HK
dc.subjectRoad safetyen_HK
dc.subjectSpeed limiten_HK
dc.subjectTreatment groupen_HK
dc.titleWould relaxing speed limits aggravate safety?: A case study of Hong Kongen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, SC: hhecwsc@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLoo, BPY: bpyloo@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, SC=rp00191en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLoo, BPY=rp00608en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.aap.2004.09.008en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-12344301162en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros97172-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-12344301162&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume37en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage377en_HK
dc.identifier.epage388en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000227193200020-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, SC=24323361400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSze, NN=8412831200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLo, HK=36786895900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHung, WT=7201803618en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLoo, BPY=7005145560en_HK

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