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Article: Numerical studies of the influence of microstructure on rock failure in uniaxial compression - Part I: Effect of heterogeneity

TitleNumerical studies of the influence of microstructure on rock failure in uniaxial compression - Part I: Effect of heterogeneity
Authors
Issue Date2000
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ijrmms
Citation
International Journal Of Rock Mechanics And Mining Sciences, 2000, v. 37 n. 4, p. 555-569 How to Cite?
AbstractA numerical parameter-sensitivity analysis has been conducted to evaluate the effect of heterogeneity on the fracture processes and strength characterization of brittle materials such as rock under uniaxial compression loadings. This was done using the Rock Failure Process Analysis code (RFPA(2D)). Studying the details of macrofracture formation from specimen to specimen due to local variation in a heterogeneous material, a number of features were consistently obtained in the numerical simulations. In relatively homogeneous specimens, the macrofracture nucleated abruptly at a point in the specimen soon after reaching the peak stress. Prior to macrofracture nucleation, a small number of acoustic emission (AE) events or microfractures were distributed randomly throughout the specimen. It is difficult to predict where the macrofracture will initiate for the homogeneous rock type since the failure of the specimen is completely brittle. On the other hand, relatively heterogeneous specimens show a somewhat different response. In this case, more diffused AE events or microfractures appear in the early stage of loading. As opposed to homogeneous specimens, macrofracture nucleation starts well before the peak stress is reached and the fracture propagation, as well as the coalescence, can be traced. These events are precursors for predicting unstable failure of the specimen. For specimens with the same property of heterogeneity, however, the numerical simulations show that the failure modes depend greatly on the fracture initiation location - which is found to be sensitive to local variations within the specimen. Peak strength is dependent on the heterogeneous nature of the specimens. Splitting and faulting failure modes often observed in experiments are also observed in the simulations under uniaxial compression. It is found that tension fractures are the dominant failure mechanism in both splitting and faulting processes. The numerical simulation shows that faulting is mainly a process of tensile fractures, often en echelon fractures, developed in a highly stressed shear band, just is as observed in actual uniaxial compression tests. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/150169
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.01
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.134
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTang, CAen_US
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, PKKen_US
dc.contributor.authorTsui, Yen_US
dc.contributor.authorTham, LGen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:02:00Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:02:00Z-
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Rock Mechanics And Mining Sciences, 2000, v. 37 n. 4, p. 555-569en_US
dc.identifier.issn1365-1609en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/150169-
dc.description.abstractA numerical parameter-sensitivity analysis has been conducted to evaluate the effect of heterogeneity on the fracture processes and strength characterization of brittle materials such as rock under uniaxial compression loadings. This was done using the Rock Failure Process Analysis code (RFPA(2D)). Studying the details of macrofracture formation from specimen to specimen due to local variation in a heterogeneous material, a number of features were consistently obtained in the numerical simulations. In relatively homogeneous specimens, the macrofracture nucleated abruptly at a point in the specimen soon after reaching the peak stress. Prior to macrofracture nucleation, a small number of acoustic emission (AE) events or microfractures were distributed randomly throughout the specimen. It is difficult to predict where the macrofracture will initiate for the homogeneous rock type since the failure of the specimen is completely brittle. On the other hand, relatively heterogeneous specimens show a somewhat different response. In this case, more diffused AE events or microfractures appear in the early stage of loading. As opposed to homogeneous specimens, macrofracture nucleation starts well before the peak stress is reached and the fracture propagation, as well as the coalescence, can be traced. These events are precursors for predicting unstable failure of the specimen. For specimens with the same property of heterogeneity, however, the numerical simulations show that the failure modes depend greatly on the fracture initiation location - which is found to be sensitive to local variations within the specimen. Peak strength is dependent on the heterogeneous nature of the specimens. Splitting and faulting failure modes often observed in experiments are also observed in the simulations under uniaxial compression. It is found that tension fractures are the dominant failure mechanism in both splitting and faulting processes. The numerical simulation shows that faulting is mainly a process of tensile fractures, often en echelon fractures, developed in a highly stressed shear band, just is as observed in actual uniaxial compression tests. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ijrmmsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Rock Mechanics and Mining Sciencesen_US
dc.titleNumerical studies of the influence of microstructure on rock failure in uniaxial compression - Part I: Effect of heterogeneityen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLee, PKK:hreclkk@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailTham, LG:hrectlg@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLee, PKK=rp00141en_US
dc.identifier.authorityTham, LG=rp00176en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S1365-1609(99)00121-5en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0034353205en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros57872-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0034353205&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume37en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage555en_US
dc.identifier.epage569en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000087509800001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTang, CA=7404394097en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiu, H=8396192000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, PKK=24522826500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTsui, Y=7006760586en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTham, LG=7006213628en_US

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