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Article: Kinetic analysis of forced aeration composting - II. Application of multilayer analysis for the prediction of biological degradation

TitleKinetic analysis of forced aeration composting - II. Application of multilayer analysis for the prediction of biological degradation
Authors
KeywordsAeration
Composting
Degradation
First-Order Reaction
Multilayer
Temperature
Issue Date2000
PublisherSage Science Press (UK). The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.com/journal.aspx?pid=10263
Citation
Waste Management And Research, 2000, v. 18 n. 4, p. 313-319 How to Cite?
AbstractExtensive pilot-scale composting tests for organic solid waste were conducted under different modes of aeration, to investigate vertical temperature distributions and their effect on biological degradation at different heights of the composting mass. The modes of aeration applied were upflow, downflow, alternate upflow/downflow, and internal air recirculation. Temperatures at different heights of the composting mass were continuously monitored. Results show that (i) significant variation in temperature and biodegradable volatile solids (BVS) degradation occur in the composting mass along the vertical direction when unidirectional aeration is applied; (ii) application of alternate upflow/downflow aeration or periodic mixing greatly reduces vertical gradients in temperature and biodegradable volatile solids (BVS) degradation; and (iii) the rate and extent of degradation in different layers of the composting mass can be quantitatively predicted by applying a combination of multilayer analysis and a previously established temperature-dependent first-order reaction model. | Extensive pilot-scale composting tests for organic solid waste were conducted under different modes of aeration, to investigate vertical temperature distributions and their effect on biological degradation at different heights of the composting mass. The modes of aeration applied were upflow, downflow, alternate upflow/downflow, and internal air recirculation. Temperatures at different heights of the composting mass were continuously monitored. Results show that (i) significant variation in temperature and biodegradable volatile solids (BVS) degradation occur in the composting mass along the vertical direction when unidirectional aeration is applied; (ii) application of alternate upflow/downflow aeration or periodic mixing greatly reduces vertical gradients in temperature and biodegradable volatile solids (BVS) degradation; and (iii) the rate and extent of degradation in different layers of the composting mass can be quantitatively predicted by applying a combination of multilayer analysis and a previously established temperature-dependent first-order reaction model.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/150165
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.338
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.619
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBari, QHen_US
dc.contributor.authorKoenig, Aen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:01:58Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:01:58Z-
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.identifier.citationWaste Management And Research, 2000, v. 18 n. 4, p. 313-319en_US
dc.identifier.issn0734-242Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/150165-
dc.description.abstractExtensive pilot-scale composting tests for organic solid waste were conducted under different modes of aeration, to investigate vertical temperature distributions and their effect on biological degradation at different heights of the composting mass. The modes of aeration applied were upflow, downflow, alternate upflow/downflow, and internal air recirculation. Temperatures at different heights of the composting mass were continuously monitored. Results show that (i) significant variation in temperature and biodegradable volatile solids (BVS) degradation occur in the composting mass along the vertical direction when unidirectional aeration is applied; (ii) application of alternate upflow/downflow aeration or periodic mixing greatly reduces vertical gradients in temperature and biodegradable volatile solids (BVS) degradation; and (iii) the rate and extent of degradation in different layers of the composting mass can be quantitatively predicted by applying a combination of multilayer analysis and a previously established temperature-dependent first-order reaction model. | Extensive pilot-scale composting tests for organic solid waste were conducted under different modes of aeration, to investigate vertical temperature distributions and their effect on biological degradation at different heights of the composting mass. The modes of aeration applied were upflow, downflow, alternate upflow/downflow, and internal air recirculation. Temperatures at different heights of the composting mass were continuously monitored. Results show that (i) significant variation in temperature and biodegradable volatile solids (BVS) degradation occur in the composting mass along the vertical direction when unidirectional aeration is applied; (ii) application of alternate upflow/downflow aeration or periodic mixing greatly reduces vertical gradients in temperature and biodegradable volatile solids (BVS) degradation; and (iii) the rate and extent of degradation in different layers of the composting mass can be quantitatively predicted by applying a combination of multilayer analysis and a previously established temperature-dependent first-order reaction model.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSage Science Press (UK). The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.com/journal.aspx?pid=10263en_US
dc.relation.ispartofWaste Management and Researchen_US
dc.subjectAerationen_US
dc.subjectCompostingen_US
dc.subjectDegradationen_US
dc.subjectFirst-Order Reactionen_US
dc.subjectMultilayeren_US
dc.subjectTemperatureen_US
dc.titleKinetic analysis of forced aeration composting - II. Application of multilayer analysis for the prediction of biological degradationen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailKoenig, A:kalbert@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityKoenig, A=rp00125en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1034/j.1399-3070.2000.00137.xen_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0034256027en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros60733-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0034256027&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume18en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage313en_US
dc.identifier.epage319en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000088612700003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBari, QH=6506028117en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKoenig, A=7103178143en_US

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