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Article: Kinetic analysis of forced aeration composting - I. Reaction rates and temperature

TitleKinetic analysis of forced aeration composting - I. Reaction rates and temperature
Authors
KeywordsAeration Mode
Composting
Degradation
Organic Solid Waste
Reaction Rate
Temperature
Issue Date2000
PublisherSage Science Press (UK). The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.com/journal.aspx?pid=10263
Citation
Waste Management and Research, 2000, v. 18 n. 4, p. 303-312 How to Cite?
AbstractThe kinetics of the forced aeration composting process operated under different aeration modes was studied using two specifically designed heat insulated closed pilot-scale reactors. Five pilot-scale composting tests using fresh mixture of organic solid waste were performed. The modes of aeration applied were upflow, downflow, alternate upflow/downflow, and internal air recirculation. Temperatures at different heights of the composting mass and air velocity were continuously monitored. Air flow was continuous or intermittent depending on temperature. Kinetic analysis showed that (i) temperature dependence of the reaction rates of all different aeration mode composting tests clearly followed the Arrhenius equation; (ii) the degradation of organic solids could be quantitatively predicted using the first order reaction model; and (iii) extent of degradation in the composting mass could be predicted on the basis of outlet air temperature instead of internal temperature of the composting mass. | The kinetics of the forced aeration composting process operated under different aeration modes was studied using two specifically designed heat insulated closed pilot-scale reactors. Five pilot-scale composting tests using fresh mixture of organic solid waste were performed. The modes of aeration applied were upflow, downflow, alternate upflow/downflow, and internal air recirculation. Temperatures at different heights of the composting mass and air velocity were continuously monitored. Air flow was continuous or intermittent depending on temperature. Kinetic analysis showed that (i) temperature dependence of the reaction rates of all different aeration mode composting tests clearly followed the Arrhenius equation; (ii) the degradation of organic solids could be quantitatively predicted using the first order reaction model; and (iii) extent of degradation in the composting mass could be predicted on the basis of outlet air temperature instead of internal temperature of the composting mass.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/150164
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.338
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.619
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBari, QHen_US
dc.contributor.authorKoenig, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorTao, Gen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:01:58Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:01:58Z-
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.identifier.citationWaste Management and Research, 2000, v. 18 n. 4, p. 303-312en_US
dc.identifier.issn0734-242Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/150164-
dc.description.abstractThe kinetics of the forced aeration composting process operated under different aeration modes was studied using two specifically designed heat insulated closed pilot-scale reactors. Five pilot-scale composting tests using fresh mixture of organic solid waste were performed. The modes of aeration applied were upflow, downflow, alternate upflow/downflow, and internal air recirculation. Temperatures at different heights of the composting mass and air velocity were continuously monitored. Air flow was continuous or intermittent depending on temperature. Kinetic analysis showed that (i) temperature dependence of the reaction rates of all different aeration mode composting tests clearly followed the Arrhenius equation; (ii) the degradation of organic solids could be quantitatively predicted using the first order reaction model; and (iii) extent of degradation in the composting mass could be predicted on the basis of outlet air temperature instead of internal temperature of the composting mass. | The kinetics of the forced aeration composting process operated under different aeration modes was studied using two specifically designed heat insulated closed pilot-scale reactors. Five pilot-scale composting tests using fresh mixture of organic solid waste were performed. The modes of aeration applied were upflow, downflow, alternate upflow/downflow, and internal air recirculation. Temperatures at different heights of the composting mass and air velocity were continuously monitored. Air flow was continuous or intermittent depending on temperature. Kinetic analysis showed that (i) temperature dependence of the reaction rates of all different aeration mode composting tests clearly followed the Arrhenius equation; (ii) the degradation of organic solids could be quantitatively predicted using the first order reaction model; and (iii) extent of degradation in the composting mass could be predicted on the basis of outlet air temperature instead of internal temperature of the composting mass.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSage Science Press (UK). The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.com/journal.aspx?pid=10263en_US
dc.relation.ispartofWaste Management and Researchen_US
dc.subjectAeration Modeen_US
dc.subjectCompostingen_US
dc.subjectDegradationen_US
dc.subjectOrganic Solid Wasteen_US
dc.subjectReaction Rateen_US
dc.subjectTemperatureen_US
dc.titleKinetic analysis of forced aeration composting - I. Reaction rates and temperatureen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0734-242X&volume=18 &issue=4&spage=303 &epage= 312&date=2000&atitle=Kinetics+of+forced+aeration+composting+-+I.+++Reaction+rates+and+temperature-
dc.identifier.emailKoenig, A:kalbert@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailKoenig, A: kalbert@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityKoenig, A=rp00125en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1034/j.1399-3070.2000.00114.xen_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0034256015en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros60722-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0034256015&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume18en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage303en_US
dc.identifier.epage312en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000088612700002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBari, QH=6506028117en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKoenig, A=7103178143en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGuihe, T=6507102973en_US

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