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Article: Stone cover and slope factors influencing hillside surface runoff and infiltration: Laboratory investigation

TitleStone cover and slope factors influencing hillside surface runoff and infiltration: Laboratory investigation
Authors
KeywordsInterception
Ponds
Rainfall Simulation
Slope
Stone Cover Percentage
Storage
Surface Runoff
Issue Date2000
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/4125
Citation
Hydrological Processes, 2000, v. 14 n. 10, p. 1829-1849 How to Cite?
AbstractIn this study, laboratory rainfall simulation in an extensive area was used to study the infiltration, and interception and storage from surface runoff in points with different stone cover percentages (0, 10, 20 and 30%) and slopes (5°, 1 0° and 20°). The experimental results of this study showed that the interrelationships among the slope, stone cover percentage, groundwater level, surface runoff amount, and interception and storage of the ponds were varied and irregular. No systematic patterns were detected for the change in the groundwater level, surface runoff amount, and interception and storage of the ponds with different stone cover percentages at different slopes and no threshold values were apparent. For a 5°slope, if the stone cover percentage was increased, the amount of surface runoff was reduced, the infiltration and the groundwater level experienced no significant change, and the interception and storage of the ponds increased. For a 10°slope, if the stone cover percentage was increased, the amount of surface runoff increased, the infiltration decreased, the groundwater level experienced no significant change or decreased slightly at certain points, and the interception and storage of the ponds increased. For a 20° slope, if the stone cover percentage was increased, the amount of surface runoff increased, the infiltration decreased, the groundwater level experienced no significant change or decreased slightly at certain points, and the interception and storage of the ponds increased. With or without stone cover, when the hydraulic conductivity of the top material is close to that of fine sand or laterite, an increase in the slope gradient decreased the amount of surface runoff and increased the storage amo unt of the ponds. As for the stone distribution, an interlaced style showed better performance in the interception and storage of ponds than that of a regular style. There was no significant change in the groundwater level. Copyright (C) 2000 John Wiley and Sons, Ltd. | In this study, laboratory rainfall simulation in an extensive area was used to study the infiltration, and interception and storage from surface runoff in points with different stone cover percentages (0, 10, 20 and 30%) and slopes (5°, 10° and 20°). The experimental results of this study showed that the interrelationships among the slope, stone cover percentage, groundwater level, surface runoff amount, and interception and storage of the ponds were varied and irregular. No systematic patterns were detected for the change in the groundwater level, surface runoff amount, and interception and storage of the ponds with different stone cover percentages at different slopes and no threshold values were apparent. For a 5° slope, if the stone cover percentage was increased, the amount of surface runoff was reduced, the infiltration and the groundwater level experienced no significant change, and the interception and storage of the ponds increased. For a 10° slope, if the stone cover percentage was increased, the amount of surface runoff increased, the infiltration decreased, the groundwater level experienced no significant change or decreased slightly at certain points, and the interception and storage of the ponds increased. For a 20° slope, if the stone cover percentage was increased, the amount of surface runoff increased, the infiltration decreased, the groundwater level experienced no significant change or decreased slightly at certain points, and the interception and storage of the ponds increased. With or without stone cover, when the hydraulic conductivity of the top material is close to that of fine sand or laterite, an increase in the slope gradient decreased the amount of surface runoff and increased the storage amount of the ponds. As for the stone distribution, an interlaced style showed better performance in the interception and storage of ponds than that of a regular style. There was no significant change in the groundwater level.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/150163
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.768
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.419
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorJean, JSen_US
dc.contributor.authorAi, KFen_US
dc.contributor.authorShih, Ken_US
dc.contributor.authorHung, CCen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:01:58Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:01:58Z-
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.identifier.citationHydrological Processes, 2000, v. 14 n. 10, p. 1829-1849en_US
dc.identifier.issn0885-6087en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/150163-
dc.description.abstractIn this study, laboratory rainfall simulation in an extensive area was used to study the infiltration, and interception and storage from surface runoff in points with different stone cover percentages (0, 10, 20 and 30%) and slopes (5°, 1 0° and 20°). The experimental results of this study showed that the interrelationships among the slope, stone cover percentage, groundwater level, surface runoff amount, and interception and storage of the ponds were varied and irregular. No systematic patterns were detected for the change in the groundwater level, surface runoff amount, and interception and storage of the ponds with different stone cover percentages at different slopes and no threshold values were apparent. For a 5°slope, if the stone cover percentage was increased, the amount of surface runoff was reduced, the infiltration and the groundwater level experienced no significant change, and the interception and storage of the ponds increased. For a 10°slope, if the stone cover percentage was increased, the amount of surface runoff increased, the infiltration decreased, the groundwater level experienced no significant change or decreased slightly at certain points, and the interception and storage of the ponds increased. For a 20° slope, if the stone cover percentage was increased, the amount of surface runoff increased, the infiltration decreased, the groundwater level experienced no significant change or decreased slightly at certain points, and the interception and storage of the ponds increased. With or without stone cover, when the hydraulic conductivity of the top material is close to that of fine sand or laterite, an increase in the slope gradient decreased the amount of surface runoff and increased the storage amo unt of the ponds. As for the stone distribution, an interlaced style showed better performance in the interception and storage of ponds than that of a regular style. There was no significant change in the groundwater level. Copyright (C) 2000 John Wiley and Sons, Ltd. | In this study, laboratory rainfall simulation in an extensive area was used to study the infiltration, and interception and storage from surface runoff in points with different stone cover percentages (0, 10, 20 and 30%) and slopes (5°, 10° and 20°). The experimental results of this study showed that the interrelationships among the slope, stone cover percentage, groundwater level, surface runoff amount, and interception and storage of the ponds were varied and irregular. No systematic patterns were detected for the change in the groundwater level, surface runoff amount, and interception and storage of the ponds with different stone cover percentages at different slopes and no threshold values were apparent. For a 5° slope, if the stone cover percentage was increased, the amount of surface runoff was reduced, the infiltration and the groundwater level experienced no significant change, and the interception and storage of the ponds increased. For a 10° slope, if the stone cover percentage was increased, the amount of surface runoff increased, the infiltration decreased, the groundwater level experienced no significant change or decreased slightly at certain points, and the interception and storage of the ponds increased. For a 20° slope, if the stone cover percentage was increased, the amount of surface runoff increased, the infiltration decreased, the groundwater level experienced no significant change or decreased slightly at certain points, and the interception and storage of the ponds increased. With or without stone cover, when the hydraulic conductivity of the top material is close to that of fine sand or laterite, an increase in the slope gradient decreased the amount of surface runoff and increased the storage amount of the ponds. As for the stone distribution, an interlaced style showed better performance in the interception and storage of ponds than that of a regular style. There was no significant change in the groundwater level.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/4125en_US
dc.relation.ispartofHydrological Processesen_US
dc.subjectInterceptionen_US
dc.subjectPondsen_US
dc.subjectRainfall Simulationen_US
dc.subjectSlopeen_US
dc.subjectStone Cover Percentageen_US
dc.subjectStorageen_US
dc.subjectSurface Runoffen_US
dc.titleStone cover and slope factors influencing hillside surface runoff and infiltration: Laboratory investigationen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailShih, K:kshih@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityShih, K=rp00167en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/1099-1085(200007)14:10<1829::AID-HYP66>3.0.CO;2-#en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0034234075en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0034234075&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume14en_US
dc.identifier.issue10en_US
dc.identifier.spage1829en_US
dc.identifier.epage1849en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000088508700008-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJean, JS=7101826280en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAi, KF=6603967924en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridShih, K=14072108900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHung, CC=7403166694en_US

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