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Article: EARLY THERMAL CRACKING OF CONCRETE - A CASE HISTORY.

TitleEARLY THERMAL CRACKING OF CONCRETE - A CASE HISTORY.
Authors
Issue Date1985
Citation
Concrete International, 1985, v. 7 n. 5, p. 36-38 How to Cite?
AbstractAn investigation into the cause of cracking of a new railroad station is described. A large number of cracks was discovered upon removal of form-work. The cracks developed in the reinforced concrete beams, some extending into the adjoining slabs above. Structural calculations indicate that the multitude and extent of cracking could not have been caused by the self weight of the concrete beams. Site records show that concreting was carried out in hot weather when the temperature was in the high thirties C (high nineties F). With a rather high cement content, the heat of hydration of cement could have raised the temperature of the concrete 30 C (54 F) above the ambient temperature. When the concrete subsequently cooled down, the thermal movement manifested itself in the form of cracking.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/149871
ISSN
2002 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.126

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChung, HWen_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, PKKen_US
dc.contributor.authorHo, Den_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:00:16Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:00:16Z-
dc.date.issued1985en_US
dc.identifier.citationConcrete International, 1985, v. 7 n. 5, p. 36-38en_US
dc.identifier.issn0162-4075en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/149871-
dc.description.abstractAn investigation into the cause of cracking of a new railroad station is described. A large number of cracks was discovered upon removal of form-work. The cracks developed in the reinforced concrete beams, some extending into the adjoining slabs above. Structural calculations indicate that the multitude and extent of cracking could not have been caused by the self weight of the concrete beams. Site records show that concreting was carried out in hot weather when the temperature was in the high thirties C (high nineties F). With a rather high cement content, the heat of hydration of cement could have raised the temperature of the concrete 30 C (54 F) above the ambient temperature. When the concrete subsequently cooled down, the thermal movement manifested itself in the form of cracking.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofConcrete Internationalen_US
dc.titleEARLY THERMAL CRACKING OF CONCRETE - A CASE HISTORY.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLee, PKK:hreclkk@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLee, PKK=rp00141en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0022066579en_US
dc.identifier.volume7en_US
dc.identifier.issue5en_US
dc.identifier.spage36en_US
dc.identifier.epage38en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChung, HW=7404007487en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, PKK=24522826500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, D=7402972029en_US

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