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Article: Voices of donors: case reports of body donation in Hong Kong
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TitleVoices of donors: case reports of body donation in Hong Kong
 
AuthorsChiu, HY1
Ng, KS1
Ma, SK1
Chan, CH1
Ng, SW1
Tipoe, GL1
Chan, LK1
 
KeywordsBequest program
Body donation
Cadaver
Chinese culture
Medical education
 
Issue Date2012
 
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/(ISSN)1935-9780/issues/
 
CitationAnatomical Sciences Education, 2012, v. 5 n. 5, p. 295-300 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ase.1280
 
AbstractBody donation is important for medical education and academic research. However, it is relatively rare in Hong Kong when compared with many Western countries. Comprehensive research has been performed on the motivation for body donation in Western countries; however, there is still insufficient research on body donation in Hong Kong to provide information on how to increase the body-donation rate. To understand the factors involved in the decision to donate one's body, the authors interviewed a registered donor and the daughter of another donor in Hong Kong. The authors interpreted the information collected in light of the available published reports, which mostly focus on body donation in Western countries. Despite the consistency of some demographic factors and motivations between the participants in our study and those investigated in the published reports from Western countries, there are differences in education level and socioeconomic status between the donors in our study and those from Western studies. The authors also suggest that Confucianism and Buddhism in Chinese culture may motivate potential body donors in Hong Kong. Other important factors that influence the body-donation decision may include family members' body donation, registration as organ donors, and good doctor-patient relationships. Although case report studies have their limitations, this study allows us to explore the complexity of events and establish the interconnectivity of factors involved in body donation, which could not be achieved in previous survey-based studies.
 
ISSN1935-9772
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ase.1280
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000308373200007
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorChiu, HY
 
dc.contributor.authorNg, KS
 
dc.contributor.authorMa, SK
 
dc.contributor.authorChan, CH
 
dc.contributor.authorNg, SW
 
dc.contributor.authorTipoe, GL
 
dc.contributor.authorChan, LK
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T05:58:40Z
 
dc.date.available2012-06-26T05:58:40Z
 
dc.date.issued2012
 
dc.description.abstractBody donation is important for medical education and academic research. However, it is relatively rare in Hong Kong when compared with many Western countries. Comprehensive research has been performed on the motivation for body donation in Western countries; however, there is still insufficient research on body donation in Hong Kong to provide information on how to increase the body-donation rate. To understand the factors involved in the decision to donate one's body, the authors interviewed a registered donor and the daughter of another donor in Hong Kong. The authors interpreted the information collected in light of the available published reports, which mostly focus on body donation in Western countries. Despite the consistency of some demographic factors and motivations between the participants in our study and those investigated in the published reports from Western countries, there are differences in education level and socioeconomic status between the donors in our study and those from Western studies. The authors also suggest that Confucianism and Buddhism in Chinese culture may motivate potential body donors in Hong Kong. Other important factors that influence the body-donation decision may include family members' body donation, registration as organ donors, and good doctor-patient relationships. Although case report studies have their limitations, this study allows us to explore the complexity of events and establish the interconnectivity of factors involved in body donation, which could not be achieved in previous survey-based studies.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationAnatomical Sciences Education, 2012, v. 5 n. 5, p. 295-300 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ase.1280
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ase.1280
 
dc.identifier.epage300
 
dc.identifier.hkuros200048
 
dc.identifier.hkuros201852
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000308373200007
 
dc.identifier.issn1935-9772
 
dc.identifier.issue5
 
dc.identifier.pmid22532489
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84859932880
 
dc.identifier.spage295
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/149788
 
dc.identifier.volume5
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/(ISSN)1935-9780/issues/
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofAnatomical Sciences Education
 
dc.rightsAnatomical Sciences Education. Copyright © John Wiley & Sons, Inc..
 
dc.subjectBequest program
 
dc.subjectBody donation
 
dc.subjectCadaver
 
dc.subjectChinese culture
 
dc.subjectMedical education
 
dc.titleVoices of donors: case reports of body donation in Hong Kong
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<item><contributor.author>Chiu, HY</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Ng, KS</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Ma, SK</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Chan, CH</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Ng, SW</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Tipoe, GL</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Chan, LK</contributor.author>
<date.accessioned>2012-06-26T05:58:40Z</date.accessioned>
<date.available>2012-06-26T05:58:40Z</date.available>
<date.issued>2012</date.issued>
<identifier.citation>Anatomical Sciences Education, 2012, v. 5 n. 5, p. 295-300</identifier.citation>
<identifier.issn>1935-9772</identifier.issn>
<identifier.uri>http://hdl.handle.net/10722/149788</identifier.uri>
<description.abstract>Body donation is important for medical education and academic research. However, it is relatively rare in Hong Kong when compared with many Western countries. Comprehensive research has been performed on the motivation for body donation in Western countries; however, there is still insufficient research on body donation in Hong Kong to provide information on how to increase the body-donation rate. To understand the factors involved in the decision to donate one&apos;s body, the authors interviewed a registered donor and the daughter of another donor in Hong Kong. The authors interpreted the information collected in light of the available published reports, which mostly focus on body donation in Western countries. Despite the consistency of some demographic factors and motivations between the participants in our study and those investigated in the published reports from Western countries, there are differences in education level and socioeconomic status between the donors in our study and those from Western studies. The authors also suggest that Confucianism and Buddhism in Chinese culture may motivate potential body donors in Hong Kong. Other important factors that influence the body-donation decision may include family members&apos; body donation, registration as organ donors, and good doctor-patient relationships. Although case report studies have their limitations, this study allows us to explore the complexity of events and establish the interconnectivity of factors involved in body donation, which could not be achieved in previous survey-based studies.</description.abstract>
<language>eng</language>
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<rights>Anatomical Sciences Education. Copyright &#169; John Wiley &amp; Sons, Inc..</rights>
<subject>Bequest program</subject>
<subject>Body donation</subject>
<subject>Cadaver</subject>
<subject>Chinese culture</subject>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine