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Article: Peptide nanofiber scaffold for brain tissue reconstruction

TitlePeptide nanofiber scaffold for brain tissue reconstruction
Authors
KeywordsCortical resection model
Nanofiber scaffold
SAPNS
Surgical brain injury
TUNEL
Issue Date2012
PublisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/bookseries/00766879
Citation
Methods In Enzymology, 2012, v. 508, p. 177-190 How to Cite?
AbstractTraumatic brain injury (TBI) and neurosurgical procedures commonly result in tissue loss within the cerebral parenchyma. Regeneration is limited by the anatomical tissue gaps and the hostile microenvironment created by the trauma. A search for novel biomaterials that are neuroprotective and conducive to healing and regeneration is needed. One approach is with the use of RADA16-I, a type I self-assembling peptide nanofiber scaffold. We review the current evidence on the use of RADA16-I and describe our experience with its use in rodent models of surgical brain injury. A cortical resection model is used to mimic the significant amount of tissue loss seen in TBI and clinical surgery. The use of RADA16-I as a carrier of transplantable neuroprogenitor cells and a potential topical hemostatic agent is described. RADA16-I can bridge tissue gaps and reduce surrounding reactive changes. Embedment of transplantable cells within the tissue scaffold is feasible. RADA16-I achieves hemostasis almost instantaneously and is associated with less tissue damage when compared with other conventional methods. There are, however, certain limitations with the application of RADA16-I mainly due to its intrinsically low pH and need for prebuffering. The use of peptide nanofiber scaffold is a promising approach for the reconstruction of the injured brain. New experimental models and research methods are required to fully explore its potential in minimizing secondary brain injuries and to promote neuronal regeneration. © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/149786
ISSN
2014 Impact Factor: 2.088
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.501
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GKKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWang, YCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWu, Wen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T05:58:38Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T05:58:38Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_HK
dc.identifier.citationMethods In Enzymology, 2012, v. 508, p. 177-190en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0076-6879en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/149786-
dc.description.abstractTraumatic brain injury (TBI) and neurosurgical procedures commonly result in tissue loss within the cerebral parenchyma. Regeneration is limited by the anatomical tissue gaps and the hostile microenvironment created by the trauma. A search for novel biomaterials that are neuroprotective and conducive to healing and regeneration is needed. One approach is with the use of RADA16-I, a type I self-assembling peptide nanofiber scaffold. We review the current evidence on the use of RADA16-I and describe our experience with its use in rodent models of surgical brain injury. A cortical resection model is used to mimic the significant amount of tissue loss seen in TBI and clinical surgery. The use of RADA16-I as a carrier of transplantable neuroprogenitor cells and a potential topical hemostatic agent is described. RADA16-I can bridge tissue gaps and reduce surrounding reactive changes. Embedment of transplantable cells within the tissue scaffold is feasible. RADA16-I achieves hemostasis almost instantaneously and is associated with less tissue damage when compared with other conventional methods. There are, however, certain limitations with the application of RADA16-I mainly due to its intrinsically low pH and need for prebuffering. The use of peptide nanofiber scaffold is a promising approach for the reconstruction of the injured brain. New experimental models and research methods are required to fully explore its potential in minimizing secondary brain injuries and to promote neuronal regeneration. © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/bookseries/00766879en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofMethods in Enzymologyen_HK
dc.subjectCortical resection modelen_HK
dc.subjectNanofiber scaffolden_HK
dc.subjectSAPNSen_HK
dc.subjectSurgical brain injuryen_HK
dc.subjectTUNELen_HK
dc.titlePeptide nanofiber scaffold for brain tissue reconstructionen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GKK: gilberto@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWu, W: wtwu@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GKK=rp00522en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWu, W=rp00419en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/B978-0-12-391860-4.00009-4en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid22449926-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84859047405en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84859047405&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume508en_HK
dc.identifier.spage177en_HK
dc.identifier.epage190en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000303133200009-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, GKK=35965118200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, YC=55147334000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWu, W=7407081122en_HK

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