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Article: The biology of EBV infection in human epithelial cells
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TitleThe biology of EBV infection in human epithelial cells
 
AuthorsTsao, SW1
Tsang, CM1
Pang, PS1
Zhang, G1
Chen, H1
Lo, KW2
 
KeywordsBiology Of Infection
Ebv
Epithelial Cells
Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma
 
Issue Date2012
 
PublisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/semcancer
 
CitationSeminars In Cancer Biology, 2012, v. 22 n. 2, p. 137-143 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.semcancer.2012.02.004
 
AbstractEBV-associated human malignancies may originate from B cells and epithelial cells. EBV readily infects B cells in vitro and transforms them into proliferative lymphoblastoid cell lines. In contrast, infection of human epithelial cells in vitro with EBV has been difficult to achieve. The lack of experimental human epithelial cell systems for EBV infection has hampered the understanding of biology of EBV infection in epithelial cells. The recent success to infect human epithelial cells with EBV in vitro has allowed systematic investigations into routes of EBV entry, regulation of latent and lytic EBV infection, and persistence of EBV infection in infected epithelial cells. Understanding the biology of EBV infection in human epithelial cells will provide important insights to the role of EBV infection in the pathogenesis of EBV-associated epithelial malignancies including nasopharyngeal carcinoma and gastric carcinoma. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.
 
ISSN1044-579X
2013 Impact Factor: 9.143
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.semcancer.2012.02.004
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000302450100008
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Research Grants Council of Hong Kong (AoE NPC)AoE/M-06/08
GRF7770/07M
776608M
777809
779810
780911
471610
471211
CRCG, University of Hong Kong
Funding Information:

This work is supported by the following funding: Research Grants Council of Hong Kong (AoE NPC; grant number: AoE/M-06/08); (GRF grant numbers: 7770/07M, 776608M, 777809, 779810, 780911, 471610, 471211): CRCG Grant, University of Hong Kong.

 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
GrantsCentre for Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Research
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorTsao, SW
 
dc.contributor.authorTsang, CM
 
dc.contributor.authorPang, PS
 
dc.contributor.authorZhang, G
 
dc.contributor.authorChen, H
 
dc.contributor.authorLo, KW
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T05:58:31Z
 
dc.date.available2012-06-26T05:58:31Z
 
dc.date.issued2012
 
dc.description.abstractEBV-associated human malignancies may originate from B cells and epithelial cells. EBV readily infects B cells in vitro and transforms them into proliferative lymphoblastoid cell lines. In contrast, infection of human epithelial cells in vitro with EBV has been difficult to achieve. The lack of experimental human epithelial cell systems for EBV infection has hampered the understanding of biology of EBV infection in epithelial cells. The recent success to infect human epithelial cells with EBV in vitro has allowed systematic investigations into routes of EBV entry, regulation of latent and lytic EBV infection, and persistence of EBV infection in infected epithelial cells. Understanding the biology of EBV infection in human epithelial cells will provide important insights to the role of EBV infection in the pathogenesis of EBV-associated epithelial malignancies including nasopharyngeal carcinoma and gastric carcinoma. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationSeminars In Cancer Biology, 2012, v. 22 n. 2, p. 137-143 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.semcancer.2012.02.004
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.semcancer.2012.02.004
 
dc.identifier.epage143
 
dc.identifier.hkuros208495
 
dc.identifier.hkuros195045
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000302450100008
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Research Grants Council of Hong Kong (AoE NPC)AoE/M-06/08
GRF7770/07M
776608M
777809
779810
780911
471610
471211
CRCG, University of Hong Kong
Funding Information:

This work is supported by the following funding: Research Grants Council of Hong Kong (AoE NPC; grant number: AoE/M-06/08); (GRF grant numbers: 7770/07M, 776608M, 777809, 779810, 780911, 471610, 471211): CRCG Grant, University of Hong Kong.

 
dc.identifier.issn1044-579X
2013 Impact Factor: 9.143
 
dc.identifier.issue2
 
dc.identifier.pmid22497025
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84862816141
 
dc.identifier.spage137
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/149782
 
dc.identifier.volume22
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/semcancer
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofSeminars in Cancer Biology
 
dc.relation.projectCentre for Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Research
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subjectBiology Of Infection
 
dc.subjectEbv
 
dc.subjectEpithelial Cells
 
dc.subjectNasopharyngeal Carcinoma
 
dc.titleThe biology of EBV infection in human epithelial cells
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine
  2. Chinese University of Hong Kong