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Article: Ultrasound-enhanced intrascleral delivery of protein

TitleUltrasound-enhanced intrascleral delivery of protein
Authors
KeywordsCavitation
Non-invasive
Ocular delivery
Posterior segment
Sonophoresis
Issue Date2010
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ijpharm
Citation
International Journal Of Pharmaceutics, 2010, v. 401 n. 1-2, p. 16-24 How to Cite?
AbstractWe aim to investigate ultrasound on enhancing protein penetration into the sclera, a non-invasive method to overcome the first barrier in taking the transscleral route for delivering therapeutics. Rabbit eyes were immersed in a fluorescein isothiocyanate conjugated bovine serum albumin solution. The distances of protein penetration, with and without ultrasound (30s continuous wave, 1MHz, 0.05W/cm 2) applied on the sclera, and at different immersion time intervals (0, 5, 15, 30 and 60min), were measured by examining the cryo-sectioned tissues under fluorescence microscope (≥60 measurements from 3 eyes for each condition). Retina was examined for structural damage by histology. It was found that ultrasound enhances the intrascleral penetration of protein, increasing the diffusivity by 1.6-folds while causing no damage to the retinal tissues. This physical modulation of the sclera is temporary, as evident by the restoration of the diffusional resistance at 15min after ultrasound treatment. The negligible effect of ultrasound-induced convection and the minimal temperature rise (<0.5°C), together with cavitation detected by acoustic emission and a decreased penetration distance at higher ultrasound frequency (30s continuous wave, 3MHz, 0.05W/cm 2), suggest that cavitation is a possible mechanism for increasing the permeability of the sclera for diffusive transport. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/149752
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.994
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.315
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Hong Kong Research Grant CouncilRPC06/07.EG11
Innovation and Technology FundITS/174/09
Funding Information:

The authors thank The Hong Kong Research Grant Council (RPC06/07.EG11) and the Innovation and Technology Fund (ITS/174/09) for financial support.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheung, ACYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYu, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTay, Den_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, HSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorEllisBehnke, Ren_HK
dc.contributor.authorChau, Yen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T05:58:04Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T05:58:04Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Pharmaceutics, 2010, v. 401 n. 1-2, p. 16-24en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0378-5173en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/149752-
dc.description.abstractWe aim to investigate ultrasound on enhancing protein penetration into the sclera, a non-invasive method to overcome the first barrier in taking the transscleral route for delivering therapeutics. Rabbit eyes were immersed in a fluorescein isothiocyanate conjugated bovine serum albumin solution. The distances of protein penetration, with and without ultrasound (30s continuous wave, 1MHz, 0.05W/cm 2) applied on the sclera, and at different immersion time intervals (0, 5, 15, 30 and 60min), were measured by examining the cryo-sectioned tissues under fluorescence microscope (≥60 measurements from 3 eyes for each condition). Retina was examined for structural damage by histology. It was found that ultrasound enhances the intrascleral penetration of protein, increasing the diffusivity by 1.6-folds while causing no damage to the retinal tissues. This physical modulation of the sclera is temporary, as evident by the restoration of the diffusional resistance at 15min after ultrasound treatment. The negligible effect of ultrasound-induced convection and the minimal temperature rise (<0.5°C), together with cavitation detected by acoustic emission and a decreased penetration distance at higher ultrasound frequency (30s continuous wave, 3MHz, 0.05W/cm 2), suggest that cavitation is a possible mechanism for increasing the permeability of the sclera for diffusive transport. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ijpharmen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Pharmaceuticsen_HK
dc.subjectCavitationen_HK
dc.subjectNon-invasiveen_HK
dc.subjectOcular deliveryen_HK
dc.subjectPosterior segmenten_HK
dc.subjectSonophoresisen_HK
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshBiological Transporten_US
dc.subject.meshCattleen_US
dc.subject.meshDiffusionen_US
dc.subject.meshDrug Delivery Systemsen_US
dc.subject.meshMicroscopy, Fluorescenceen_US
dc.subject.meshPermeabilityen_US
dc.subject.meshPhonophoresisen_US
dc.subject.meshProteins - Administration & Dosage - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshRabbitsen_US
dc.subject.meshRetina - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshSclera - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshSerum Albumin - Administration & Dosage - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshTemperatureen_US
dc.titleUltrasound-enhanced intrascleral delivery of proteinen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailEllisBehnke, R: rutledg@mit.eduen_HK
dc.identifier.authorityEllisBehnke, R=rp00252en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ijpharm.2010.09.001en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20868732-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-78049261849en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-78049261849&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume401en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1-2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage16en_HK
dc.identifier.epage24en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000285222700003-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, ACY=35083351000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYu, Y=55348493600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTay, D=55392935900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, HS=37035315900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridEllisBehnke, R=8548055200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChau, Y=8135312000en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike7893218-

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