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Article: Fluid intake and the risk of bladder cancer: Results from the South and East China case-control study on bladder cancer
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TitleFluid intake and the risk of bladder cancer: Results from the South and East China case-control study on bladder cancer
 
AuthorsHemelt, M6
Hu, Z5
Zhong, Z1
Xie, LP3
Wong, YC2
Tam, PC2
Cheng, KK6
Ye, Z5
Bi, X7
Lu, Q1
Mao, Y3
Zhong, WD7
Zeegers, MP6 4
 
Issue Date2010
 
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/29331/home
 
CitationInternational Journal Of Cancer, 2010, v. 127 n. 3, p. 638-645 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ijc.25084
 
AbstractAlthough several studies have assessed the association between total fluid intake, specific drinks and bladder cancer, no firm conclusions can yet be drawn. Four hundred thirty two bladder cancer cases and 392 frequency matched hospital-based controls recruited in the South and East of China between October 2005 and June 2008 were interviewed on their intake of 6 nonalcoholic and 3 alcoholic drinks. Age, sex, smoking and hospital-adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95 percent confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated for all drinks and for total fluid intake using logistic regression. For 381 cases (81.9% men) and 371 controls (76.3% men), total fluid intake could be calculated. In men, an increase in total fluid intake was associated with a significantly decreased bladder cancer risk (OR 0.93, 95% CI: 0.88-0.99, per cup fluid consumed). Neither green nor black tea consumption was associated with bladder cancer. Daily consumption of milk significantly reduced the risk of bladder cancer by a half (OR 0.49, 95% CI: 0.32-0.76), which strengthens earlier suggestions that milk is probably associated with a decreased bladder cancer risk. Consumption of wine (OR 0.49, 95% CI: 0.34-0.70) and liquor/spirits (OR 0.65, 95% CI: 0.47-0.92) were associated with a significantly reduced risk. Consumption of water, fruit juice and beer appeared not associated with bladder cancer. There is no clear indication that the risks observed in this Chinese population are substantially different from those observed in Caucasian populations. © 2009 UICC.
 
ISSN0020-7136
2013 Impact Factor: 5.007
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ijc.25084
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000279131300015
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Royal Society
Cancer Research UK
Medical Research Council
Funding Information:

Grant sponsors: Royal Society, Cancer Research UK, the Medical Research Council

 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorHemelt, M
 
dc.contributor.authorHu, Z
 
dc.contributor.authorZhong, Z
 
dc.contributor.authorXie, LP
 
dc.contributor.authorWong, YC
 
dc.contributor.authorTam, PC
 
dc.contributor.authorCheng, KK
 
dc.contributor.authorYe, Z
 
dc.contributor.authorBi, X
 
dc.contributor.authorLu, Q
 
dc.contributor.authorMao, Y
 
dc.contributor.authorZhong, WD
 
dc.contributor.authorZeegers, MP
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T05:57:56Z
 
dc.date.available2012-06-26T05:57:56Z
 
dc.date.issued2010
 
dc.description.abstractAlthough several studies have assessed the association between total fluid intake, specific drinks and bladder cancer, no firm conclusions can yet be drawn. Four hundred thirty two bladder cancer cases and 392 frequency matched hospital-based controls recruited in the South and East of China between October 2005 and June 2008 were interviewed on their intake of 6 nonalcoholic and 3 alcoholic drinks. Age, sex, smoking and hospital-adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95 percent confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated for all drinks and for total fluid intake using logistic regression. For 381 cases (81.9% men) and 371 controls (76.3% men), total fluid intake could be calculated. In men, an increase in total fluid intake was associated with a significantly decreased bladder cancer risk (OR 0.93, 95% CI: 0.88-0.99, per cup fluid consumed). Neither green nor black tea consumption was associated with bladder cancer. Daily consumption of milk significantly reduced the risk of bladder cancer by a half (OR 0.49, 95% CI: 0.32-0.76), which strengthens earlier suggestions that milk is probably associated with a decreased bladder cancer risk. Consumption of wine (OR 0.49, 95% CI: 0.34-0.70) and liquor/spirits (OR 0.65, 95% CI: 0.47-0.92) were associated with a significantly reduced risk. Consumption of water, fruit juice and beer appeared not associated with bladder cancer. There is no clear indication that the risks observed in this Chinese population are substantially different from those observed in Caucasian populations. © 2009 UICC.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Cancer, 2010, v. 127 n. 3, p. 638-645 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ijc.25084
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ijc.25084
 
dc.identifier.epage645
 
dc.identifier.hkuros206459
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000279131300015
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Royal Society
Cancer Research UK
Medical Research Council
Funding Information:

Grant sponsors: Royal Society, Cancer Research UK, the Medical Research Council

 
dc.identifier.issn0020-7136
2013 Impact Factor: 5.007
 
dc.identifier.issue3
 
dc.identifier.pmid19957334
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77954430262
 
dc.identifier.spage638
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/149745
 
dc.identifier.volume127
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/29331/home
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Cancer
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshAged
 
dc.subject.meshCase-Control Studies
 
dc.subject.meshChina - Epidemiology
 
dc.subject.meshDrinking Behavior
 
dc.subject.meshFemale
 
dc.subject.meshHumans
 
dc.subject.meshMale
 
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged
 
dc.subject.meshRisk Factors
 
dc.subject.meshUrinary Bladder Neoplasms - Epidemiology
 
dc.titleFluid intake and the risk of bladder cancer: Results from the South and East China case-control study on bladder cancer
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. Second Xiangya Hospital of Central-South University
  2. The University of Hong Kong
  3. Zhejiang University School of Medicine
  4. Maastricht University
  5. Huazhong University of Science and Technology
  6. University of Birmingham
  7. Guangzhou Medical College