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Article: Fluid intake and the risk of bladder cancer: Results from the South and East China case-control study on bladder cancer

TitleFluid intake and the risk of bladder cancer: Results from the South and East China case-control study on bladder cancer
Authors
Issue Date2010
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/29331/home
Citation
International Journal Of Cancer, 2010, v. 127 n. 3, p. 638-645 How to Cite?
Abstract
Although several studies have assessed the association between total fluid intake, specific drinks and bladder cancer, no firm conclusions can yet be drawn. Four hundred thirty two bladder cancer cases and 392 frequency matched hospital-based controls recruited in the South and East of China between October 2005 and June 2008 were interviewed on their intake of 6 nonalcoholic and 3 alcoholic drinks. Age, sex, smoking and hospital-adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95 percent confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated for all drinks and for total fluid intake using logistic regression. For 381 cases (81.9% men) and 371 controls (76.3% men), total fluid intake could be calculated. In men, an increase in total fluid intake was associated with a significantly decreased bladder cancer risk (OR 0.93, 95% CI: 0.88-0.99, per cup fluid consumed). Neither green nor black tea consumption was associated with bladder cancer. Daily consumption of milk significantly reduced the risk of bladder cancer by a half (OR 0.49, 95% CI: 0.32-0.76), which strengthens earlier suggestions that milk is probably associated with a decreased bladder cancer risk. Consumption of wine (OR 0.49, 95% CI: 0.34-0.70) and liquor/spirits (OR 0.65, 95% CI: 0.47-0.92) were associated with a significantly reduced risk. Consumption of water, fruit juice and beer appeared not associated with bladder cancer. There is no clear indication that the risks observed in this Chinese population are substantially different from those observed in Caucasian populations. © 2009 UICC.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/149745
ISSN
2013 Impact Factor: 5.007
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Royal Society
Cancer Research UK
Medical Research Council
Funding Information:

Grant sponsors: Royal Society, Cancer Research UK, the Medical Research Council

References

 

Author Affiliations
  1. Second Xiangya Hospital of Central-South University
  2. The University of Hong Kong
  3. Zhejiang University School of Medicine
  4. Maastricht University
  5. Huazhong University of Science and Technology
  6. University of Birmingham
  7. Guangzhou Medical College
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHemelt, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorHu, Zen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhong, Zen_US
dc.contributor.authorXie, LPen_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, YCen_US
dc.contributor.authorTam, PCen_US
dc.contributor.authorCheng, KKen_US
dc.contributor.authorYe, Zen_US
dc.contributor.authorBi, Xen_US
dc.contributor.authorLu, Qen_US
dc.contributor.authorMao, Yen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhong, WDen_US
dc.contributor.authorZeegers, MPen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T05:57:56Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T05:57:56Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Cancer, 2010, v. 127 n. 3, p. 638-645en_US
dc.identifier.issn0020-7136en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/149745-
dc.description.abstractAlthough several studies have assessed the association between total fluid intake, specific drinks and bladder cancer, no firm conclusions can yet be drawn. Four hundred thirty two bladder cancer cases and 392 frequency matched hospital-based controls recruited in the South and East of China between October 2005 and June 2008 were interviewed on their intake of 6 nonalcoholic and 3 alcoholic drinks. Age, sex, smoking and hospital-adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95 percent confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated for all drinks and for total fluid intake using logistic regression. For 381 cases (81.9% men) and 371 controls (76.3% men), total fluid intake could be calculated. In men, an increase in total fluid intake was associated with a significantly decreased bladder cancer risk (OR 0.93, 95% CI: 0.88-0.99, per cup fluid consumed). Neither green nor black tea consumption was associated with bladder cancer. Daily consumption of milk significantly reduced the risk of bladder cancer by a half (OR 0.49, 95% CI: 0.32-0.76), which strengthens earlier suggestions that milk is probably associated with a decreased bladder cancer risk. Consumption of wine (OR 0.49, 95% CI: 0.34-0.70) and liquor/spirits (OR 0.65, 95% CI: 0.47-0.92) were associated with a significantly reduced risk. Consumption of water, fruit juice and beer appeared not associated with bladder cancer. There is no clear indication that the risks observed in this Chinese population are substantially different from those observed in Caucasian populations. © 2009 UICC.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/29331/homeen_US
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Canceren_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshCase-Control Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshChina - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshDrinking Behavioren_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshUrinary Bladder Neoplasms - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.titleFluid intake and the risk of bladder cancer: Results from the South and East China case-control study on bladder canceren_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailWong, YC:ycwong@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWong, YC=rp00316en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/ijc.25084en_US
dc.identifier.pmid19957334en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77954430262en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros206459-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77954430262&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume127en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage638en_US
dc.identifier.epage645en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000279131300015-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHemelt, M=18436933800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHu, Z=7404210577en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhong, Z=8731538000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridXie, LP=7402590347en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, YC=7403041798en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTam, PC=7202539419en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheng, KK=7402997800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYe, Z=7401956734en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBi, X=8221667300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLu, Q=55231335600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMao, Y=36196870800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhong, WD=7402328742en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZeegers, MP=7003691618en_US

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