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Article: Human γδ T cells: A lymphoid lineage cell capable of professional phagocytosis
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TitleHuman γδ T cells: A lymphoid lineage cell capable of professional phagocytosis
 
AuthorsWu, Y
Wu, W2 1
Wong, WM2 1
Ward, E
Thrasher, AJ
Goldblatt, D3
Osman, M
Digard, P4
Canaday, DH5
Gustafsson, K
 
Issue Date2009
 
PublisherAmerican Association of Immunologists. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.jimmunol.org
 
CitationJournal Of Immunology, 2009, v. 183 n. 9, p. 5622-5629 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4049/jimmunol.0901772
 
AbstractProfessional phagocytosis in mammals is considered to be performed exclusively by myeloid cell types. In this study, we demonstrate, for the first time, that a mammalian lymphocyte subset can operate as a professional phagocyte. By using confocal microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and functional Ag presentation assays, we find that freshly isolated human peripheral blood γδ T cells can phagocytose Escherichia coli and 1 μm synthetic beads via Ab opsonization and CD16 (FcγRIII), leading to Ag processing and presentation on MHC class II. In contrast, other CD16 + lymphocytes, i.e., CD16 +/CD56 + NK cells, were not capable of such functions. These findings of distinct myeloid characteristics in γδ T cells strongly support the suggestion that γδ T cells are evolutionarily ancient lymphocytes and have implications for our understanding of their role in transitional immunity and the control of infectious diseases and cancer. Copyright © 2009 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.
 
ISSN0022-1767
2012 Impact Factor: 5.52
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.170
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.4049/jimmunol.0901772
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000271488500025
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Jean Shanks Foundation
Funding Information:

This work was supported by the Jean Shanks Foundation.

 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorWu, Y
 
dc.contributor.authorWu, W
 
dc.contributor.authorWong, WM
 
dc.contributor.authorWard, E
 
dc.contributor.authorThrasher, AJ
 
dc.contributor.authorGoldblatt, D
 
dc.contributor.authorOsman, M
 
dc.contributor.authorDigard, P
 
dc.contributor.authorCanaday, DH
 
dc.contributor.authorGustafsson, K
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T05:57:53Z
 
dc.date.available2012-06-26T05:57:53Z
 
dc.date.issued2009
 
dc.description.abstractProfessional phagocytosis in mammals is considered to be performed exclusively by myeloid cell types. In this study, we demonstrate, for the first time, that a mammalian lymphocyte subset can operate as a professional phagocyte. By using confocal microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and functional Ag presentation assays, we find that freshly isolated human peripheral blood γδ T cells can phagocytose Escherichia coli and 1 μm synthetic beads via Ab opsonization and CD16 (FcγRIII), leading to Ag processing and presentation on MHC class II. In contrast, other CD16 + lymphocytes, i.e., CD16 +/CD56 + NK cells, were not capable of such functions. These findings of distinct myeloid characteristics in γδ T cells strongly support the suggestion that γδ T cells are evolutionarily ancient lymphocytes and have implications for our understanding of their role in transitional immunity and the control of infectious diseases and cancer. Copyright © 2009 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Immunology, 2009, v. 183 n. 9, p. 5622-5629 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4049/jimmunol.0901772
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.4049/jimmunol.0901772
 
dc.identifier.epage5629
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000271488500025
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Jean Shanks Foundation
Funding Information:

This work was supported by the Jean Shanks Foundation.

 
dc.identifier.issn0022-1767
2012 Impact Factor: 5.52
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.170
 
dc.identifier.issue9
 
dc.identifier.pmid19843947
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77952704343
 
dc.identifier.spage5622
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/149742
 
dc.identifier.volume183
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherAmerican Association of Immunologists. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.jimmunol.org
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Immunology
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshAmino Acid Sequence
 
dc.subject.meshAnimals
 
dc.subject.meshAntigen Presentation - Immunology
 
dc.subject.meshCell Line
 
dc.subject.meshCell Line, Transformed
 
dc.subject.meshCell Line, Tumor
 
dc.subject.meshCell Lineage - Immunology
 
dc.subject.meshCoculture Techniques
 
dc.subject.meshEscherichia Coli - Immunology
 
dc.subject.meshHla-A Antigens - Immunology - Metabolism
 
dc.subject.meshHla-Drb1 Chains
 
dc.subject.meshHumans
 
dc.subject.meshMice
 
dc.subject.meshMice, Transgenic
 
dc.subject.meshMicrospheres
 
dc.subject.meshMolecular Sequence Data
 
dc.subject.meshOpsonin Proteins - Metabolism
 
dc.subject.meshPhagocytosis - Immunology
 
dc.subject.meshReceptors, Antigen, T-Cell, Gamma-Delta - Biosynthesis - Physiology
 
dc.subject.meshReceptors, Igg - Physiology
 
dc.subject.meshT-Lymphocyte Subsets - Immunology - Metabolism - Ultrastructure
 
dc.subject.meshViral Matrix Proteins - Immunology - Metabolism
 
dc.titleHuman γδ T cells: A lymphoid lineage cell capable of professional phagocytosis
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine
  2. The University of Hong Kong
  3. UCL Institute of Child Health
  4. University of Cambridge
  5. Case Western Reserve University