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Article: S-allylcysteine, a water-soluble garlic derivative, suppresses the growth of a human androgen-independent prostate cancer xenograft, CWR22R, under in vivo conditions

TitleS-allylcysteine, a water-soluble garlic derivative, suppresses the growth of a human androgen-independent prostate cancer xenograft, CWR22R, under in vivo conditions
Authors
Issue Date2007
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/BJU
Citation
Bju International, 2007, v. 99 n. 4, p. 925-932 How to Cite?
AbstractOBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of S-allylcysteine (SAC) on CWR22R, a human androgen-independent (AI) prostate cancer xenograft, in nude mice. Despite extensive research worldwide there is no effective way to control the growth of prostate cancer, and we previously reported that SAC and S- allylmercaptocysteine (SAMC), two water-soluble derivatives of garlic, inhibit cancer cell invasion through restoration of E-cadherin expression in vitro. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The effects of SAC on tumour cell proliferation markers such as Ki-67 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and apoptotic regulators including Bcl-2 and cleaved caspase-3, were assessed by immunohistochemical staining. The inhibitory effects of SAC on prostate cancer invasion was examined by immunoreactivity of E-cadherin and its binding proteins α, β and γ-catenins. The serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level at three different times (initiation, middle and end of treatment) and toxicity of SAC on several organs after treatment were assessed. RESULTS: Treatment with SAC resulted in inhibition of the growth of CWR22R, with no detectable toxic effect on nude mice. The SAC-induced growth reduction was correlated with a concurrent reduction in serum PSA level and proliferation rate of xenografts, together with an inhibition of invasion through the restoration of E-cadherin and γ-catenin expression. Furthermore, the apoptotic rate of SAC-treated tumours increased together with a decrease in Bcl-2 and increase in cleaved caspase-3. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that this garlic-derived compound might be a potential therapeutic agent for suppressing AI prostate cancer. © 2006 The Authors.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/149669
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.387
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.009
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChu, Qen_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, DTWen_US
dc.contributor.authorTsao, SWen_US
dc.contributor.authorWang, Xen_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, YCen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T05:56:49Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T05:56:49Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.identifier.citationBju International, 2007, v. 99 n. 4, p. 925-932en_US
dc.identifier.issn1464-4096en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/149669-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of S-allylcysteine (SAC) on CWR22R, a human androgen-independent (AI) prostate cancer xenograft, in nude mice. Despite extensive research worldwide there is no effective way to control the growth of prostate cancer, and we previously reported that SAC and S- allylmercaptocysteine (SAMC), two water-soluble derivatives of garlic, inhibit cancer cell invasion through restoration of E-cadherin expression in vitro. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The effects of SAC on tumour cell proliferation markers such as Ki-67 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and apoptotic regulators including Bcl-2 and cleaved caspase-3, were assessed by immunohistochemical staining. The inhibitory effects of SAC on prostate cancer invasion was examined by immunoreactivity of E-cadherin and its binding proteins α, β and γ-catenins. The serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level at three different times (initiation, middle and end of treatment) and toxicity of SAC on several organs after treatment were assessed. RESULTS: Treatment with SAC resulted in inhibition of the growth of CWR22R, with no detectable toxic effect on nude mice. The SAC-induced growth reduction was correlated with a concurrent reduction in serum PSA level and proliferation rate of xenografts, together with an inhibition of invasion through the restoration of E-cadherin and γ-catenin expression. Furthermore, the apoptotic rate of SAC-treated tumours increased together with a decrease in Bcl-2 and increase in cleaved caspase-3. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that this garlic-derived compound might be a potential therapeutic agent for suppressing AI prostate cancer. © 2006 The Authors.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/BJUen_US
dc.relation.ispartofBJU Internationalen_US
dc.subject.meshAndrogens - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshAntineoplastic Agents - Pharmacologyen_US
dc.subject.meshCysteine - Analogs & Derivatives - Pharmacologyen_US
dc.subject.meshDrug Screening Assays, Antitumoren_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiceen_US
dc.subject.meshMice, Nudeen_US
dc.subject.meshNeoplasms, Hormone-Dependent - Drug Therapy - Pathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshProstate-Specific Antigen - Blooden_US
dc.subject.meshProstatic Neoplasms - Drug Therapy - Pathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshTransplantation, Heterologousen_US
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcomeen_US
dc.titleS-allylcysteine, a water-soluble garlic derivative, suppresses the growth of a human androgen-independent prostate cancer xenograft, CWR22R, under in vivo conditionsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailTsao, SW:gswtsao@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailWong, YC:ycwong@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityTsao, SW=rp00399en_US
dc.identifier.authorityWong, YC=rp00316en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1464-410X.2006.06639.xen_US
dc.identifier.pmid17155983-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33947309070en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros138252-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33947309070&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume99en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage925en_US
dc.identifier.epage932en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000244977500042-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChu, Q=15047860400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, DTW=7406666118en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTsao, SW=7102813116en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, X=7501854829en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, YC=7403041798en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike1178128-

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