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Article: Neural regeneration and neuronal migration following injury. I. The endocrine hypothalamus and neurohypophyseal system

TitleNeural regeneration and neuronal migration following injury. I. The endocrine hypothalamus and neurohypophyseal system
Authors
Issue Date1995
PublisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/yexnr
Citation
Experimental Neurology, 1995, v. 131 n. 1, p. 23-38 How to Cite?
AbstractCentral to this investigation are several basic hypotheses that are designed to test the role of nitric oxide (NO) in the complex process of central regeneration and plasticity in a well established model system of the mammalian brain. We have employed histochemical techniques at the light and ultrastructural level coupled with correlative scanning electron microscopy, immunoelectron microscopy, and in situ hybridization in order to determine the functional significance of the increased expression of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in neurons of the supraoptic (SON) and paraventricular (PVN) nuclei which accompanies regeneration of their axotomized neurites following hypophysectomy, The aim of this investigation was to determine the potential role and temporal up-regulation of NOS in this basic regenerative process and to establish the ultrastructural and neuroanatomical correlates during critical periods of regeneration and regrowth of SON and PVN axons following hypophysectomy in the endocrine hypothalamus of the rat. Our data support the hypothesis that NO may serve as a second messenger molecule that may act in some fashion to govern not only the process of central regeneration and regrowth of magnocellular (SON/PVN) axons into the median eminence, neural stem, and neural lobe (the neurohypophyseal system) but may also influence the regeneration of neurites into new neuroanatomical domains such as the adjacent lumen of the third cerebral ventricle. We have demonstrated a distinct temporal relationship between injury (axotomy) of SON/PVN axons and the establishment of new neurovascular zones following hypophysectomy with the up-regulation of NOS. This up-regulation appears to correlate well with successful regeneration in the mammalian neurohypophyseal system. We have also successfully inhibited axonal regeneration with the use of nitroarginine, a competitive antagonist of NO. NOS up-regulation attendant to regeneration of SON and PVN axons may have inestimable clinical implications, particularly with respect to closed head injury and cerebral contusion that involves the mechanical shearing of the infundibular stalk. In addition, this investigation has reaffirmed that large numbers of bona fide neurons migrate and emerge upon the floor of the adjacent third cerebral ventricle shortly following hypophysectomy (within 2 weeks). The origin and mechanisms of neuronal migration and plasticity following hypophysectomy are the subject of interpretation and discussion in this investigation.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/149551
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.657
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.427
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorScott, DEen_US
dc.contributor.authorWu, Wen_US
dc.contributor.authorSlusser, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorDepto, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorHansen, Sen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T05:55:12Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T05:55:12Z-
dc.date.issued1995en_US
dc.identifier.citationExperimental Neurology, 1995, v. 131 n. 1, p. 23-38en_US
dc.identifier.issn0014-4886en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/149551-
dc.description.abstractCentral to this investigation are several basic hypotheses that are designed to test the role of nitric oxide (NO) in the complex process of central regeneration and plasticity in a well established model system of the mammalian brain. We have employed histochemical techniques at the light and ultrastructural level coupled with correlative scanning electron microscopy, immunoelectron microscopy, and in situ hybridization in order to determine the functional significance of the increased expression of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in neurons of the supraoptic (SON) and paraventricular (PVN) nuclei which accompanies regeneration of their axotomized neurites following hypophysectomy, The aim of this investigation was to determine the potential role and temporal up-regulation of NOS in this basic regenerative process and to establish the ultrastructural and neuroanatomical correlates during critical periods of regeneration and regrowth of SON and PVN axons following hypophysectomy in the endocrine hypothalamus of the rat. Our data support the hypothesis that NO may serve as a second messenger molecule that may act in some fashion to govern not only the process of central regeneration and regrowth of magnocellular (SON/PVN) axons into the median eminence, neural stem, and neural lobe (the neurohypophyseal system) but may also influence the regeneration of neurites into new neuroanatomical domains such as the adjacent lumen of the third cerebral ventricle. We have demonstrated a distinct temporal relationship between injury (axotomy) of SON/PVN axons and the establishment of new neurovascular zones following hypophysectomy with the up-regulation of NOS. This up-regulation appears to correlate well with successful regeneration in the mammalian neurohypophyseal system. We have also successfully inhibited axonal regeneration with the use of nitroarginine, a competitive antagonist of NO. NOS up-regulation attendant to regeneration of SON and PVN axons may have inestimable clinical implications, particularly with respect to closed head injury and cerebral contusion that involves the mechanical shearing of the infundibular stalk. In addition, this investigation has reaffirmed that large numbers of bona fide neurons migrate and emerge upon the floor of the adjacent third cerebral ventricle shortly following hypophysectomy (within 2 weeks). The origin and mechanisms of neuronal migration and plasticity following hypophysectomy are the subject of interpretation and discussion in this investigation.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/yexnren_US
dc.relation.ispartofExperimental Neurologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAmino Acid Oxidoreductases - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshCell Movementen_US
dc.subject.meshCerebral Ventricles - Metabolism - Physiology - Ultrastructureen_US
dc.subject.meshHypophysectomyen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMedian Eminence - Physiology - Ultrastructureen_US
dc.subject.meshNerve Regenerationen_US
dc.subject.meshNeurites - Physiology - Ultrastructureen_US
dc.subject.meshNeurons - Metabolism - Physiology - Ultrastructureen_US
dc.subject.meshNitric Oxide Synthaseen_US
dc.subject.meshParaventricular Hypothalamic Nucleus - Metabolism - Physiology - Ultrastructureen_US
dc.subject.meshRatsen_US
dc.subject.meshRats, Sprague-Dawleyen_US
dc.subject.meshSupraoptic Nucleus - Metabolism - Physiology - Ultrastructureen_US
dc.subject.meshUp-Regulationen_US
dc.titleNeural regeneration and neuronal migration following injury. I. The endocrine hypothalamus and neurohypophyseal systemen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailWu, W:wtwu@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWu, W=rp00419en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/0014-4886(95)90004-7en_US
dc.identifier.pmid7534719-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0028909823en_US
dc.identifier.volume131en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage23en_US
dc.identifier.epage38en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1995QN05600003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridScott, DE=7404951677en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWu, W=7407081122en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSlusser, J=16224963800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDepto, A=6603415757en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHansen, S=16170489500en_US

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