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Article: Transplantation of the mammalian pineal gland: Studies of survival, revascularization, reinnervation, and recovery of function

TitleTransplantation of the mammalian pineal gland: Studies of survival, revascularization, reinnervation, and recovery of function
Authors
Issue Date1993
PublisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/yexnr
Citation
Experimental Neurology, 1993, v. 122 n. 1, p. 88-99 How to Cite?
AbstractThe survival, revascularization, reinnervation, and recovery of function of transplanted rat pineal glands were studied following grafting into four different locations in pinealectomized rats. Pineal grafts were well vascularized by fenestrated capillaries. Pinealocytes in the grafts maintained high-metabolic activity. More nerve fibers and terminals were observed in the grafts within the anterior chamber of the eye than in the third cerebral ventricle and the pineal region (in situ transplantation). No fibers or terminals were found in grafts placed beneath the renal capsule. Nighttime serum melatonin levels increased significantly in pinealectomized rats with transplants into either the third cerebral ventricle or the anterior eye chamber. This increase might reflect graft reinnervation. Yet day-night differences in serum melatonin were observed only in host rats receiving transplants in the anterior eye chamber. In conclusion, pinealocytes survived transplantation into different locations and exhibited ultrastructural features indicative of active secretory proceses; however, day-night differences in serum melatonin are only restored following transplants into the anterior eye chamber. Reinnervation of the grafts by the host superior cervical ganglion is necessary for this restoration.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/149530
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.657
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.427
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWu, Wen_US
dc.contributor.authorScott, DEen_US
dc.contributor.authorReiter, RJen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T05:54:52Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T05:54:52Z-
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.identifier.citationExperimental Neurology, 1993, v. 122 n. 1, p. 88-99en_US
dc.identifier.issn0014-4886en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/149530-
dc.description.abstractThe survival, revascularization, reinnervation, and recovery of function of transplanted rat pineal glands were studied following grafting into four different locations in pinealectomized rats. Pineal grafts were well vascularized by fenestrated capillaries. Pinealocytes in the grafts maintained high-metabolic activity. More nerve fibers and terminals were observed in the grafts within the anterior chamber of the eye than in the third cerebral ventricle and the pineal region (in situ transplantation). No fibers or terminals were found in grafts placed beneath the renal capsule. Nighttime serum melatonin levels increased significantly in pinealectomized rats with transplants into either the third cerebral ventricle or the anterior eye chamber. This increase might reflect graft reinnervation. Yet day-night differences in serum melatonin were observed only in host rats receiving transplants in the anterior eye chamber. In conclusion, pinealocytes survived transplantation into different locations and exhibited ultrastructural features indicative of active secretory proceses; however, day-night differences in serum melatonin are only restored following transplants into the anterior eye chamber. Reinnervation of the grafts by the host superior cervical ganglion is necessary for this restoration.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/yexnren_US
dc.relation.ispartofExperimental Neurologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshCapillaries - Ultrastructureen_US
dc.subject.meshGraft Survivalen_US
dc.subject.meshMelatonin - Blooden_US
dc.subject.meshMicroscopy, Electronen_US
dc.subject.meshNerve Fibers - Metabolism - Ultrastructureen_US
dc.subject.meshNerve Regenerationen_US
dc.subject.meshOsmolar Concentrationen_US
dc.subject.meshPineal Gland - Blood Supply - Physiology - Transplantationen_US
dc.subject.meshRatsen_US
dc.subject.meshRats, Sprague-Dawleyen_US
dc.subject.meshTyrosine 3-Monooxygenase - Metabolismen_US
dc.titleTransplantation of the mammalian pineal gland: Studies of survival, revascularization, reinnervation, and recovery of functionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailWu, W:wtwu@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWu, W=rp00419en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1006/exnr.1993.1110en_US
dc.identifier.pmid8101823-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0027185939en_US
dc.identifier.volume122en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage88en_US
dc.identifier.epage99en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1993LR10200010-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWu, W=7407081122en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridScott, DE=7404951677en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridReiter, RJ=7402574751en_US

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