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Article: p53 mutation in human nasopharyngeal carcinomas

Titlep53 mutation in human nasopharyngeal carcinomas
Authors
Issue Date1992
Citation
Anticancer Research, 1992, v. 12 n. 6 B, p. 1957-1963 How to Cite?
AbstractNasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is the third most common cancer in the southern provinces of China, but a rare cancer in other parts of the world. Epidemiological studies suggested a multifactorial etiology of NPC involving infection of Epstein Barr virus (EBV), genetic predisposition, environmental factors, such as consumption of salted fish, and other unknown factors. p53 mutation is a common event in many forms of human cancers but its possible involvement in the pathogenesis of NPC has not been examined. The presence of p53 mutation in NPC is studied by the sensitive PCR-SSCP analysis and direct DNA sequencing method. The frequent sites of p53 mutation (exons 4 to 8) reported in other human tumors were studied. Thirty-eight biopsied tumors of NPC and 4 NPC cell lines were examined for the presence of p53 mutation. No mutation of p53 resulting in change in amino acid sequence of the encoded p53 protein was identified in any of the biopsied tumors. RFLP studies of the biopsied materials of NPC also revealed no loss of heterozygosity at chromosome region 17p13 in 15 out of 15 informative cases, which further supports the conclusion that p53 mutetion is an infrequent event in NPC. Apparently, p53 mutation has no significant role in the pathogenesis of this special group of human cancers. However, p53 mutation is frequently observed in cell lines derived from the primary NPC tumors. All the three NPC cell lines examined carry a missense p53 mutation, suggesting that mutation of the p53 gene may confer growth advantage to the tumor cells to become established in culture.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/149526
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.895
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.815
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLo, KWen_US
dc.contributor.authorMok, CHen_US
dc.contributor.authorHuang, DPen_US
dc.contributor.authorLiu, YXen_US
dc.contributor.authorChoi, PHKen_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, JCKen_US
dc.contributor.authorTsao, SWen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T05:54:50Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T05:54:50Z-
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.identifier.citationAnticancer Research, 1992, v. 12 n. 6 B, p. 1957-1963en_US
dc.identifier.issn0250-7005en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/149526-
dc.description.abstractNasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is the third most common cancer in the southern provinces of China, but a rare cancer in other parts of the world. Epidemiological studies suggested a multifactorial etiology of NPC involving infection of Epstein Barr virus (EBV), genetic predisposition, environmental factors, such as consumption of salted fish, and other unknown factors. p53 mutation is a common event in many forms of human cancers but its possible involvement in the pathogenesis of NPC has not been examined. The presence of p53 mutation in NPC is studied by the sensitive PCR-SSCP analysis and direct DNA sequencing method. The frequent sites of p53 mutation (exons 4 to 8) reported in other human tumors were studied. Thirty-eight biopsied tumors of NPC and 4 NPC cell lines were examined for the presence of p53 mutation. No mutation of p53 resulting in change in amino acid sequence of the encoded p53 protein was identified in any of the biopsied tumors. RFLP studies of the biopsied materials of NPC also revealed no loss of heterozygosity at chromosome region 17p13 in 15 out of 15 informative cases, which further supports the conclusion that p53 mutetion is an infrequent event in NPC. Apparently, p53 mutation has no significant role in the pathogenesis of this special group of human cancers. However, p53 mutation is frequently observed in cell lines derived from the primary NPC tumors. All the three NPC cell lines examined carry a missense p53 mutation, suggesting that mutation of the p53 gene may confer growth advantage to the tumor cells to become established in culture.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofAnticancer Researchen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshChina - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshDna, Neoplasm - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshExonsen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshGenes, P53en_US
dc.subject.meshHeterozygoteen_US
dc.subject.meshHong Kong - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshMutationen_US
dc.subject.meshNasopharyngeal Neoplasms - Epidemiology - Genetics - Pathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshNeoplasms - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshPolymerase Chain Reaction - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshTumor Cells, Cultureden_US
dc.titlep53 mutation in human nasopharyngeal carcinomasen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailTsao, SW:gswtsao@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityTsao, SW=rp00399en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid1295443-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0027104441en_US
dc.identifier.volume12en_US
dc.identifier.issue6 Ben_US
dc.identifier.spage1957en_US
dc.identifier.epage1963en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1992KP43000006-
dc.publisher.placeGreeceen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLo, KW=7402101603en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMok, CH=7102344233en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHuang, DP=7403891486en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiu, YX=7410216332en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChoi, PHK=7102909162en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, JCK=7601456915en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTsao, SW=7102813116en_US

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