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Article: Influence of male genital tract mesenchymes on differentiation of Dunning prostatic adenocarcinoma

TitleInfluence of male genital tract mesenchymes on differentiation of Dunning prostatic adenocarcinoma
Authors
Issue Date1990
PublisherAmerican Association for Cancer Research. The Journal's web site is located at http://cancerres.aacrjournals.org/
Citation
Cancer Research, 1990, v. 50 n. 15, p. 4747-4754 How to Cite?
AbstractEighteen-day-old fetal urogenital sinus mesenchyme (UGM), 0-day-old neonatal seminal vesicle mesenchyme (SVM), 0-day-old neonatal bulbourethral gland mesenchyme (BUG-M), and 3-day-old neonatal urinary bladder mesenchyme (BLM) were isolated from rats and combined in vitro with 0.5-mm cubes of the R3327 androgen-dependent Dunning prostatic adenocarcinoma (DT). The resultant tissue combinations were grown as subcapsular renal grafts in male or female hosts. Grafts of the slow growing DT increased only marginally in size in male hosts and were composed of small tubules lined with an undifferentiated simple squamous to cuboidal epithelium. When grown in association with BLM the DT continued to exhibit its characteristic histodifferentiation and, based upon graft size, exhibited little growth in male hosts. By contrast, tissue combinations of UGM + DT, SVM + DT, and BUG-M + DT enlarged many-fold in size. DT carcinoma cells in combination with UGM, SVM, or BUG-M (a) were induced to undergo morphogenetic changes by forming larger more regularly organized ducts, (b) differentiated into a tall polarized columnar epithelial cells, and (c) produced secretion which accumulated in the lumen, when grown in male hosts. By DNA analysis, UGM + DT and SVM + DT combinations grown for 1 month were considerably larger than grafts of DT by itself and contained 1.76 and 1.97 times the amount of DNA than the sum of the individual components grown alone for 1 month in male hosts. Thus, the proliferative activity of DT cells appear to have been influenced by UGM and SVM. These findings show that the DT retains a responsiveness to its connective tissue environment which may alter certain aspects its pathobiology.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/149505
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 8.556
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 5.372
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHayashi, Nen_US
dc.contributor.authorCunha, GRen_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, YCen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T05:54:37Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T05:54:37Z-
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.identifier.citationCancer Research, 1990, v. 50 n. 15, p. 4747-4754en_US
dc.identifier.issn0008-5472en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/149505-
dc.description.abstractEighteen-day-old fetal urogenital sinus mesenchyme (UGM), 0-day-old neonatal seminal vesicle mesenchyme (SVM), 0-day-old neonatal bulbourethral gland mesenchyme (BUG-M), and 3-day-old neonatal urinary bladder mesenchyme (BLM) were isolated from rats and combined in vitro with 0.5-mm cubes of the R3327 androgen-dependent Dunning prostatic adenocarcinoma (DT). The resultant tissue combinations were grown as subcapsular renal grafts in male or female hosts. Grafts of the slow growing DT increased only marginally in size in male hosts and were composed of small tubules lined with an undifferentiated simple squamous to cuboidal epithelium. When grown in association with BLM the DT continued to exhibit its characteristic histodifferentiation and, based upon graft size, exhibited little growth in male hosts. By contrast, tissue combinations of UGM + DT, SVM + DT, and BUG-M + DT enlarged many-fold in size. DT carcinoma cells in combination with UGM, SVM, or BUG-M (a) were induced to undergo morphogenetic changes by forming larger more regularly organized ducts, (b) differentiated into a tall polarized columnar epithelial cells, and (c) produced secretion which accumulated in the lumen, when grown in male hosts. By DNA analysis, UGM + DT and SVM + DT combinations grown for 1 month were considerably larger than grafts of DT by itself and contained 1.76 and 1.97 times the amount of DNA than the sum of the individual components grown alone for 1 month in male hosts. Thus, the proliferative activity of DT cells appear to have been influenced by UGM and SVM. These findings show that the DT retains a responsiveness to its connective tissue environment which may alter certain aspects its pathobiology.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Association for Cancer Research. The Journal's web site is located at http://cancerres.aacrjournals.org/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofCancer Researchen_US
dc.subject.meshAdenocarcinoma - Pathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshCell Differentiationen_US
dc.subject.meshCell Divisionen_US
dc.subject.meshCell Lineen_US
dc.subject.meshCells, Cultureden_US
dc.subject.meshEmbryo, Mammalianen_US
dc.subject.meshGenitalia, Male - Cytology - Physiology - Surgeryen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshOrchiectomyen_US
dc.subject.meshProstatic Neoplasms - Pathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshRatsen_US
dc.subject.meshRats, Inbred F344en_US
dc.subject.meshSubrenal Capsule Assayen_US
dc.subject.meshUrinary Bladder - Cytology - Physiology - Transplantationen_US
dc.titleInfluence of male genital tract mesenchymes on differentiation of Dunning prostatic adenocarcinomaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailWong, YC:ycwong@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWong, YC=rp00316en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid2369750-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0025297609en_US
dc.identifier.volume50en_US
dc.identifier.issue15en_US
dc.identifier.spage4747en_US
dc.identifier.epage4754en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1990DP43100051-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHayashi, N=36078182000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCunha, GR=7103155694en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, YC=7403041798en_US

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