File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Transplantation of the pineal gland in the mammalian third cerebral ventricle

TitleTransplantation of the pineal gland in the mammalian third cerebral ventricle
Authors
Issue Date1990
PublisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/yexnr
Citation
Experimental Neurology, 1990, v. 108 n. 1, p. 23-32 How to Cite?
AbstractFine structural correlates and functional parameters were measured in pinealectomized rats following grafting of the pineal gland into the third cerebral ventricle. Pinealectomy caused a significant decrease in serum melatonin concentration of animals compared to that in normal controls. No significant difference was observed in the serum melatonin concentration between pinealectomized rats and those receiving sham transplantation with fragments of occipital cortex. By 6 weeks nearly 50% of pinealectomized rats receiving pineal transplants demonstrated a significant increase in the serum melatonin concentration in contrast to that of pinealectomized rats and pinealectomized animals receiving sham transplants. Pinealocytes survived and flourished following transplantation from the epithalamic region to the third cerebral ventricle of the hypothalamus in host rats. These cells were found to be arranged individually or in clusters surrounding fenestrated capillaries of the graft. Moreover, these pinealocytes demonstrated ultrastructural features indicative of an active secretory process, including dense-core and clear vesicles as well as vacuoles containing flocculent material. Additional characteristics distinctive of normal control pinealocytes were observed in surviving cells of grafts, such as synaptic ribbons, synaptic ribbon fields, and myeloid bodies. Bundles of unmyelinated axons and apparent adrenergic nerve endings were observed with transmission electron microscopy and immunocystochemistry using antisera against tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). Nerve fibers and terminals were found within perivascular spaces surrounding fenestrated capillaries of viable grafts. These reported observations suggest that a significant population of transplanted pinealocytes recover functional activity (e.g., heightened melatonin secretion) following stereotaxis grafting into the third cerebral ventricles of pinealectomized animals. This apparent recovery of function may be linked directly to reinnervation of the gland by nerve fibers that appear to arise from the underlying median eminence.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/149503
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.657
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.427
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWu, Wen_US
dc.contributor.authorScott, DEen_US
dc.contributor.authorMiller, Een_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T05:54:36Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T05:54:36Z-
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.identifier.citationExperimental Neurology, 1990, v. 108 n. 1, p. 23-32en_US
dc.identifier.issn0014-4886en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/149503-
dc.description.abstractFine structural correlates and functional parameters were measured in pinealectomized rats following grafting of the pineal gland into the third cerebral ventricle. Pinealectomy caused a significant decrease in serum melatonin concentration of animals compared to that in normal controls. No significant difference was observed in the serum melatonin concentration between pinealectomized rats and those receiving sham transplantation with fragments of occipital cortex. By 6 weeks nearly 50% of pinealectomized rats receiving pineal transplants demonstrated a significant increase in the serum melatonin concentration in contrast to that of pinealectomized rats and pinealectomized animals receiving sham transplants. Pinealocytes survived and flourished following transplantation from the epithalamic region to the third cerebral ventricle of the hypothalamus in host rats. These cells were found to be arranged individually or in clusters surrounding fenestrated capillaries of the graft. Moreover, these pinealocytes demonstrated ultrastructural features indicative of an active secretory process, including dense-core and clear vesicles as well as vacuoles containing flocculent material. Additional characteristics distinctive of normal control pinealocytes were observed in surviving cells of grafts, such as synaptic ribbons, synaptic ribbon fields, and myeloid bodies. Bundles of unmyelinated axons and apparent adrenergic nerve endings were observed with transmission electron microscopy and immunocystochemistry using antisera against tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). Nerve fibers and terminals were found within perivascular spaces surrounding fenestrated capillaries of viable grafts. These reported observations suggest that a significant population of transplanted pinealocytes recover functional activity (e.g., heightened melatonin secretion) following stereotaxis grafting into the third cerebral ventricles of pinealectomized animals. This apparent recovery of function may be linked directly to reinnervation of the gland by nerve fibers that appear to arise from the underlying median eminence.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/yexnren_US
dc.relation.ispartofExperimental Neurologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshCapillariesen_US
dc.subject.meshCerebral Ventriclesen_US
dc.subject.meshImmunohistochemistryen_US
dc.subject.meshMedian Eminenceen_US
dc.subject.meshMelatonin - Blooden_US
dc.subject.meshMicroscopy, Electronen_US
dc.subject.meshNerve Endings - Ultrastructureen_US
dc.subject.meshPineal Gland - Blood Supply - Physiology - Transplantation - Ultrastructureen_US
dc.subject.meshRatsen_US
dc.subject.meshRats, Inbred Strainsen_US
dc.subject.meshTyrosine 3-Monooxygenase - Analysisen_US
dc.titleTransplantation of the pineal gland in the mammalian third cerebral ventricleen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailWu, W:wtwu@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWu, W=rp00419en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/0014-4886(90)90003-Ben_US
dc.identifier.pmid1969356-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0025239066en_US
dc.identifier.volume108en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage23en_US
dc.identifier.epage32en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1990CZ20500003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWu, W=7407081122en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridScott, DE=7404951677en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMiller, E=7404492631en_US

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats