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Article: Regrowth of retinal ganglion cell axons into a peripheral nerve graft in the adult hamster is enhanced by a concurrent optic nerve crush

TitleRegrowth of retinal ganglion cell axons into a peripheral nerve graft in the adult hamster is enhanced by a concurrent optic nerve crush
Authors
Issue Date1989
PublisherSpringer Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00221/index.htm
Citation
Experimental Brain Research, 1989, v. 78 n. 3, p. 567-574 How to Cite?
AbstractTransplantation of a segment of peripheral nerve to the retina of the adult hamster resulted in regrowth of damaged ganglion cell axons into the graft, with the fastest regenerating axons extending at 2 mm/day after an initial delay of 4.5 days (Cho and So 1987b). In this study, the effect of making 2 lesions on the same axon (the conditioning lesion effect) on the regrowth of ganglion cell axons into the peripheral nerve graft was examined. When a conditioning lesion (first lesion) was made by crushing the optic nerve 7 or 14 days before the peripheral nerve grafting (the second lesion) to the retina, the distance of regrowth achieved by the fastest regenerating axons in the graft, measured at the 7th post-grafting day, was lower than in animals with a peripheral nerve grafted to a normal eye. This indicated that in contrast to the situation in peripheral nerve axons (Forman et al. 1980) and goldfish optic axons (Edwards et al. 1981), the conditioning lesion was unable to enhance the regrowth of mammalian retinal ganglion cell axons. However, when crushing of the optic nerve was followed immediately by peripheral nerve grafting, an enhancement in axonal regrowth could be observed. The initial delay time before the axons extended into the peripheral nerve graft was reduced by 1 day while the rate of elongation of the fastest regrowing axons in the graft apparently remained unchanged. Moreover, the shortening of the initial delay could still be observed even when the sequence of performing the 2 lesions was reversed. From these data, it was concluded that the classical conditioning lesion effect was not responsible for the enhancement observed. Rather it was suggested that changes in the intra-retinal environment brought about by crushing of the optic nerve might account for it.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/149497
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.057
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.140
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCho, EYPen_US
dc.contributor.authorSo, KFen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T05:54:32Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T05:54:32Z-
dc.date.issued1989en_US
dc.identifier.citationExperimental Brain Research, 1989, v. 78 n. 3, p. 567-574en_US
dc.identifier.issn0014-4819en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/149497-
dc.description.abstractTransplantation of a segment of peripheral nerve to the retina of the adult hamster resulted in regrowth of damaged ganglion cell axons into the graft, with the fastest regenerating axons extending at 2 mm/day after an initial delay of 4.5 days (Cho and So 1987b). In this study, the effect of making 2 lesions on the same axon (the conditioning lesion effect) on the regrowth of ganglion cell axons into the peripheral nerve graft was examined. When a conditioning lesion (first lesion) was made by crushing the optic nerve 7 or 14 days before the peripheral nerve grafting (the second lesion) to the retina, the distance of regrowth achieved by the fastest regenerating axons in the graft, measured at the 7th post-grafting day, was lower than in animals with a peripheral nerve grafted to a normal eye. This indicated that in contrast to the situation in peripheral nerve axons (Forman et al. 1980) and goldfish optic axons (Edwards et al. 1981), the conditioning lesion was unable to enhance the regrowth of mammalian retinal ganglion cell axons. However, when crushing of the optic nerve was followed immediately by peripheral nerve grafting, an enhancement in axonal regrowth could be observed. The initial delay time before the axons extended into the peripheral nerve graft was reduced by 1 day while the rate of elongation of the fastest regrowing axons in the graft apparently remained unchanged. Moreover, the shortening of the initial delay could still be observed even when the sequence of performing the 2 lesions was reversed. From these data, it was concluded that the classical conditioning lesion effect was not responsible for the enhancement observed. Rather it was suggested that changes in the intra-retinal environment brought about by crushing of the optic nerve might account for it.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00221/index.htmen_US
dc.relation.ispartofExperimental Brain Researchen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshCricetinaeen_US
dc.subject.meshMesocricetusen_US
dc.subject.meshNerve Crushen_US
dc.subject.meshNerve Regenerationen_US
dc.subject.meshOptic Nerve - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshPeripheral Nerves - Transplantationen_US
dc.subject.meshRetina - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshRetinal Ganglion Cells - Physiologyen_US
dc.titleRegrowth of retinal ganglion cell axons into a peripheral nerve graft in the adult hamster is enhanced by a concurrent optic nerve crushen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailSo, KF:hrmaskf@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySo, KF=rp00329en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid2693126-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0024841304en_US
dc.identifier.volume78en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage567en_US
dc.identifier.epage574en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1989CF37400011-
dc.publisher.placeGermanyen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCho, EYP=7202649985en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSo, KF=34668391300en_US

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