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Article: Development and maturation of the bladder epithelium of the guinea pig

TitleDevelopment and maturation of the bladder epithelium of the guinea pig
Authors
Issue Date1981
Citation
Acta Anatomica, 1981, v. 110 n. 4, p. 359-375 How to Cite?
AbstractIn the fetal guinea pig, transitional epithelium develops at a little beyond mid-term of gestation from a single layer of columnar cells. Some of the cells elongate and overlap their neighbours, but remain attached to the basement membrane by fine cytoplasmic stalks. The fetal epithelial cells do not markedly vary in size. Within the basal layer, which is the site of mitotic activity, many cells are large and binucleate, which suggests that basal cell fusions occur. It is believed that these cells eventually become surface cells. The luminal membrane develops its asymmetric structure (asymmetric unit membrane; AUM) following the appearance of AUM-bound vesicles in the apical cytoplasm, indicating that they are the source of the luminal AUM. The vesicles originate in the Golgi cisternae and are initially cup-shaped. The immature surface cells are characterized by microvilli of varying density on the luminal surface. The characteristic mature surface ridges appear to develop from rows of microvilli which fuse and link with other rows to form a reticular pattern. The process commences shortly after mid-gestation. By -15 to -10 days, the majority of cells have a well-developed surface pattern. Microvilli, however, remain prevalent in some small surface cells. These are believed to be the younger surface cells derived from pyriform intermediate cells, with the surface not fully differentiated. During the first 3 postnatal weeks, the basal cell population reaches the adult level and mitotic activity declines. The epithelium also acquires its adult morphology, whilst its functional maturity is indicated by the adult distribution and content of both glycogen, which is reduced, and alkaline phosphatase, which is increased. Rejection of cells occurs both antenatally and postnatally, and is probably a consequence of excess cell production.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/149428
ISSN
2000 Impact Factor: 2.435
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMartin, BFen_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, YCen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T05:53:34Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T05:53:34Z-
dc.date.issued1981en_US
dc.identifier.citationActa Anatomica, 1981, v. 110 n. 4, p. 359-375en_US
dc.identifier.issn0001-5180en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/149428-
dc.description.abstractIn the fetal guinea pig, transitional epithelium develops at a little beyond mid-term of gestation from a single layer of columnar cells. Some of the cells elongate and overlap their neighbours, but remain attached to the basement membrane by fine cytoplasmic stalks. The fetal epithelial cells do not markedly vary in size. Within the basal layer, which is the site of mitotic activity, many cells are large and binucleate, which suggests that basal cell fusions occur. It is believed that these cells eventually become surface cells. The luminal membrane develops its asymmetric structure (asymmetric unit membrane; AUM) following the appearance of AUM-bound vesicles in the apical cytoplasm, indicating that they are the source of the luminal AUM. The vesicles originate in the Golgi cisternae and are initially cup-shaped. The immature surface cells are characterized by microvilli of varying density on the luminal surface. The characteristic mature surface ridges appear to develop from rows of microvilli which fuse and link with other rows to form a reticular pattern. The process commences shortly after mid-gestation. By -15 to -10 days, the majority of cells have a well-developed surface pattern. Microvilli, however, remain prevalent in some small surface cells. These are believed to be the younger surface cells derived from pyriform intermediate cells, with the surface not fully differentiated. During the first 3 postnatal weeks, the basal cell population reaches the adult level and mitotic activity declines. The epithelium also acquires its adult morphology, whilst its functional maturity is indicated by the adult distribution and content of both glycogen, which is reduced, and alkaline phosphatase, which is increased. Rejection of cells occurs both antenatally and postnatally, and is probably a consequence of excess cell production.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofActa Anatomicaen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimals, Newborn - Anatomy & Histologyen_US
dc.subject.meshEpithelium - Ultrastructureen_US
dc.subject.meshFetusen_US
dc.subject.meshGestational Ageen_US
dc.subject.meshGuinea Pigsen_US
dc.subject.meshMicroscopy, Electron, Scanningen_US
dc.subject.meshMitosisen_US
dc.subject.meshUrinary Bladder - Growth & Development - Ultrastructureen_US
dc.titleDevelopment and maturation of the bladder epithelium of the guinea pigen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailWong, YC:ycwong@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWong, YC=rp00316en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid7331768-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0019481699en_US
dc.identifier.volume110en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage359en_US
dc.identifier.epage375en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1981MG81900011-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMartin, BF=7402932098en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, YC=7403041798en_US

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