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Article: Development of abnormal recrossing retinotectal projections after superior colliculus lesions in newborn Syrian hamsters

TitleDevelopment of abnormal recrossing retinotectal projections after superior colliculus lesions in newborn Syrian hamsters
Authors
Issue Date1979
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/31248
Citation
Journal Of Comparative Neurology, 1979, v. 186 n. 2, p. 241-258 How to Cite?
AbstractThe development of the retinal projections to the roof of the midbrain was studied in Syrian hamsters after right superior colliculus (SC) lesions on the day of birth, using both autoradiogaphic and degeneration techniques. The dead tissue resulting from the heat lesion is not completely removed until the eighth day after birth. Normally the midline of the SC is defined by a pia-lined fissure separating the left and right colliculi, but in the animals with early unilateral lesions, the pia at the midline is damaged. When it regrows, together with vascular and other meningeal tissues, it forms a flat tissue bridge across the midline as early as two days after the lesion. When the axons from the left eye reach the right SC, they encounter the dead tissue and separate into two bundles. One bundle courses over the surface of the dead tissue and one grows underneath it. It is not until the third to fourth day that axons in the dorsal bundle cross the midline, via the tissue bridge, to terminate anomalously in the medial wall of the left SC. When the quantity of such recrossing axons is small, they overlap extensively with the optic tract fibers from the other (right) eye which normally have innervated the entire SC by day 3. However, it appears that as the density of the recrossing axons increases they displace the axons originating in the other eye from the medial wall of the left SC. Thus, eventually fibers from both eyes terminate in the left SC, occupying separate territories, with little, if any, overlap. Axons in the ventral bundle begin to innervate the deep layers of the right SC on day 2. These axons were never observed to recross the midline. These results indicate that mechanical guidance and axonal segregation dependent on relative densities are two processes that govern the development of retinotectal projections after early SC lesions in hamsters.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/149420
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.331
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.345
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSo, KFen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T05:53:30Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T05:53:30Z-
dc.date.issued1979en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Comparative Neurology, 1979, v. 186 n. 2, p. 241-258en_US
dc.identifier.issn0021-9967en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/149420-
dc.description.abstractThe development of the retinal projections to the roof of the midbrain was studied in Syrian hamsters after right superior colliculus (SC) lesions on the day of birth, using both autoradiogaphic and degeneration techniques. The dead tissue resulting from the heat lesion is not completely removed until the eighth day after birth. Normally the midline of the SC is defined by a pia-lined fissure separating the left and right colliculi, but in the animals with early unilateral lesions, the pia at the midline is damaged. When it regrows, together with vascular and other meningeal tissues, it forms a flat tissue bridge across the midline as early as two days after the lesion. When the axons from the left eye reach the right SC, they encounter the dead tissue and separate into two bundles. One bundle courses over the surface of the dead tissue and one grows underneath it. It is not until the third to fourth day that axons in the dorsal bundle cross the midline, via the tissue bridge, to terminate anomalously in the medial wall of the left SC. When the quantity of such recrossing axons is small, they overlap extensively with the optic tract fibers from the other (right) eye which normally have innervated the entire SC by day 3. However, it appears that as the density of the recrossing axons increases they displace the axons originating in the other eye from the medial wall of the left SC. Thus, eventually fibers from both eyes terminate in the left SC, occupying separate territories, with little, if any, overlap. Axons in the ventral bundle begin to innervate the deep layers of the right SC on day 2. These axons were never observed to recross the midline. These results indicate that mechanical guidance and axonal segregation dependent on relative densities are two processes that govern the development of retinotectal projections after early SC lesions in hamsters.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/31248en_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Comparative Neurologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimals, Newbornen_US
dc.subject.meshAutoradiographyen_US
dc.subject.meshCricetinaeen_US
dc.subject.meshMesocricetusen_US
dc.subject.meshRetina - Growth & Developmenten_US
dc.subject.meshSuperior Colliculi - Growth & Development - Injuriesen_US
dc.subject.meshVisual Pathways - Growth & Developmenten_US
dc.titleDevelopment of abnormal recrossing retinotectal projections after superior colliculus lesions in newborn Syrian hamstersen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailSo, KF:hrmaskf@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySo, KF=rp00329en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid447883-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0018763583en_US
dc.identifier.volume186en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage241en_US
dc.identifier.epage258en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1979HA22500007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSo, KF=34668391300en_US

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