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Article: Sex determination and differentiation in mammalian germ cells

TitleSex determination and differentiation in mammalian germ cells
Authors
Issue Date1977
Citation
Birth Defects: Original Article Series, 1977, v. 13 n. 2, p. 1-12 How to Cite?
AbstractThe germinal and somatic elements of the gonad are initially independent of one another and under separate genetic control mechanisms. They subsequently acquire a high degree of functional interdependence so that a defect in one cell type may have marked repercussions on the other. The behavior of the germ cell is determined in part by its genotype, and in part by the phenotypic environment in which it finds itself. Two X chromosomes are normally essential for oocyte formation, but an XX oocyte cannot survive in a testis. A Y chromosome seems to be essential in the spermatogonium if normal spermatozoa are to be produced. The somatic cells of the testis can develop normally and function as an endocrine organ in the absence of any germ cells and also apparently in the absence of a Y chromosome. However, the development of the graafian follicle, the endocrine apparatus of the ovary, is dependent on the presence of normal oocytes. A number of specific genetic loci have recently been discovered which regulate sex determination and differentiation. These include the autosomal dominant Sxr in the mouse, the autosomal recessive Polled in the goat, and the X-linked Tfm and the Y-linked histocompatibility antigen in a wide variety of species. At the moment, all the evidence points to these genes as regulators of somatic rather than germinal sex differentiation.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/149406
ISSN
1999 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.163

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorO, Wen_US
dc.contributor.authorShort, RVen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T05:53:19Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T05:53:19Z-
dc.date.issued1977en_US
dc.identifier.citationBirth Defects: Original Article Series, 1977, v. 13 n. 2, p. 1-12en_US
dc.identifier.issn0547-6844en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/149406-
dc.description.abstractThe germinal and somatic elements of the gonad are initially independent of one another and under separate genetic control mechanisms. They subsequently acquire a high degree of functional interdependence so that a defect in one cell type may have marked repercussions on the other. The behavior of the germ cell is determined in part by its genotype, and in part by the phenotypic environment in which it finds itself. Two X chromosomes are normally essential for oocyte formation, but an XX oocyte cannot survive in a testis. A Y chromosome seems to be essential in the spermatogonium if normal spermatozoa are to be produced. The somatic cells of the testis can develop normally and function as an endocrine organ in the absence of any germ cells and also apparently in the absence of a Y chromosome. However, the development of the graafian follicle, the endocrine apparatus of the ovary, is dependent on the presence of normal oocytes. A number of specific genetic loci have recently been discovered which regulate sex determination and differentiation. These include the autosomal dominant Sxr in the mouse, the autosomal recessive Polled in the goat, and the X-linked Tfm and the Y-linked histocompatibility antigen in a wide variety of species. At the moment, all the evidence points to these genes as regulators of somatic rather than germinal sex differentiation.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofBirth Defects: Original Article Seriesen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshCytoplasmen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshGenesen_US
dc.subject.meshGenetic Linkageen_US
dc.subject.meshGenotypeen_US
dc.subject.meshGoatsen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMeiosisen_US
dc.subject.meshMiceen_US
dc.subject.meshOogenesisen_US
dc.subject.meshOvum - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshPhenotypeen_US
dc.subject.meshSex Chromosomesen_US
dc.subject.meshSex Determination Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshSex Differentiationen_US
dc.subject.meshSpermatogenesisen_US
dc.subject.meshSpermatozoa - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshSwineen_US
dc.subject.meshTestis - Physiologyen_US
dc.titleSex determination and differentiation in mammalian germ cellsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailO, W:owaisum@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityO, W=rp00315en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid361095-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0017413884en_US
dc.identifier.volume13en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage1en_US
dc.identifier.epage12en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridO, W=6701729369en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridShort, RV=7202190995en_US

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