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Article: Development of the ovary and oogenesis

TitleDevelopment of the ovary and oogenesis
Authors
Issue Date1976
Citation
Clinics In Obstetrics And Gynaecology, 1976, v. 3 n. 1, p. 3-26 How to Cite?
AbstractThis review of the literature deals with processes ranging from the migration of germ cells from the yolk sac to the germinal ridge, to the atresia of the Graafian follicle. The migration stage is followed by sex differentiation. Whereas oogonia disappear, oocytes develop as far as the diplotene (resting) stage of the meiotic prophase, and only during sexual maturity is meiosis resumed at the diakinesis stage. In the female, the second meiotic division is arrested in the metaphase until fertilization occurs. The factors controlling this are obscure, they may be connected with stimulating factors produced by sex differentiation, by the mesonephros or the rete ovarii; the resumption of meiosis after resting is controlled by gonadotrophins. The origin of the granulosa cells and of the zona pellucida is also discussed; the interdigitation of microvilli growing from the oocyte and from the granulosa cells into the zona pellucida may indicate the transfer of material from the mother to the embryo. For follicular growth, gonadotrophins are needed as a trigger, but then development proceeds wihout them during the preantral stage; in the later stages, however, they are needed permanently. The factors regulating th degeneration of germ cells (atresia) are poorly understood; they may be genetic (e.g., loss of one X chromosome), environmental (loss, or genetic incompatibility of granulosa cells, and gonadotrophins produce atresia, estrogens act in the opposite way), or metabolic. The purpose of atresia is to regulate litter size and to increase the supply of steroid hormones.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/149402
ISSN
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBaker, TGen_US
dc.contributor.authorO, WSen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T05:53:16Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T05:53:16Z-
dc.date.issued1976en_US
dc.identifier.citationClinics In Obstetrics And Gynaecology, 1976, v. 3 n. 1, p. 3-26en_US
dc.identifier.issn0306-3356en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/149402-
dc.description.abstractThis review of the literature deals with processes ranging from the migration of germ cells from the yolk sac to the germinal ridge, to the atresia of the Graafian follicle. The migration stage is followed by sex differentiation. Whereas oogonia disappear, oocytes develop as far as the diplotene (resting) stage of the meiotic prophase, and only during sexual maturity is meiosis resumed at the diakinesis stage. In the female, the second meiotic division is arrested in the metaphase until fertilization occurs. The factors controlling this are obscure, they may be connected with stimulating factors produced by sex differentiation, by the mesonephros or the rete ovarii; the resumption of meiosis after resting is controlled by gonadotrophins. The origin of the granulosa cells and of the zona pellucida is also discussed; the interdigitation of microvilli growing from the oocyte and from the granulosa cells into the zona pellucida may indicate the transfer of material from the mother to the embryo. For follicular growth, gonadotrophins are needed as a trigger, but then development proceeds wihout them during the preantral stage; in the later stages, however, they are needed permanently. The factors regulating th degeneration of germ cells (atresia) are poorly understood; they may be genetic (e.g., loss of one X chromosome), environmental (loss, or genetic incompatibility of granulosa cells, and gonadotrophins produce atresia, estrogens act in the opposite way), or metabolic. The purpose of atresia is to regulate litter size and to increase the supply of steroid hormones.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofClinics in Obstetrics and Gynaecologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshGerm Cellsen_US
dc.subject.meshGestational Ageen_US
dc.subject.meshGonadotropins - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMeiosisen_US
dc.subject.meshOogenesisen_US
dc.subject.meshOvarian Follicle - Cytologyen_US
dc.subject.meshOvary - Embryologyen_US
dc.subject.meshPregnancyen_US
dc.subject.meshRatsen_US
dc.subject.meshSex Differentiationen_US
dc.subject.meshSex Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshZona Pellucidaen_US
dc.titleDevelopment of the ovary and oogenesisen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailO, WS:owaisum@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityO, WS=rp00315en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid1009717-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0017082414en_US
dc.identifier.volume3en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage3en_US
dc.identifier.epage26en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1976BY80700002-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBaker, TG=7402604778en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridO, WS=6701729369en_US

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