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Article: Thermal comfort effects of urban design strategies in high-rise urban environments in a sub-tropical climate

TitleThermal comfort effects of urban design strategies in high-rise urban environments in a sub-tropical climate
Authors
KeywordsEnvi-Met
Environmental Design
Physiological Equivalent Temperature
Thermal Comfort
Urban Albedo
Vegetation
Issue Date2011
PublisherUniversity of Sydney, Faculty of Architecture. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.arch.usyd.edu.au/asr/
Citation
Architectural Science Review, 2011, v. 54 n. 4, p. 285-304 How to Cite?
AbstractOutdoor thermal comfort is associated with the usage pattern of urban open spaces. Thermally uncomfortable outdoor environments could discourage participation in outdoor activities and increase buildings' cooling energy consumption. This article evaluated the effects of various urban design strategies on summertime outdoor thermal conditions, focusing on applications of high-albedo pavement and vegetation. Field measurement was carried out in two high-rise residential quarters in Shanghai. The result of the measurement was used to interpret the numerical simulation. Numerical simulation using ENVI-met was then applied to examine a series of urban design strategies, using the physiological equivalent temperature (PET) as the thermal comfort index. The result shows that an increase of 0.4 in the ground surface albedo overall reduces the thermal comfort, as indicated by an increase of 5-7°C in PET during the day with a marginal decrease of less than 1C at night. Increasing greenery cover, especially tree cover, improves thermal comfort during the whole period under evaluation. A reduction of up to 15°C in daytime PET is achieved by adding a dense tree cover (LAI = 6.4) over a grass lawn and up to 20°C by adding the tree cover over the hard pavement with an albedo of 0.2. © 2011 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/149392
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.627
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYang, Fen_US
dc.contributor.authorLau, SSYen_US
dc.contributor.authorQian, Fen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T05:52:54Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T05:52:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationArchitectural Science Review, 2011, v. 54 n. 4, p. 285-304en_US
dc.identifier.issn0003-8628en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/149392-
dc.description.abstractOutdoor thermal comfort is associated with the usage pattern of urban open spaces. Thermally uncomfortable outdoor environments could discourage participation in outdoor activities and increase buildings' cooling energy consumption. This article evaluated the effects of various urban design strategies on summertime outdoor thermal conditions, focusing on applications of high-albedo pavement and vegetation. Field measurement was carried out in two high-rise residential quarters in Shanghai. The result of the measurement was used to interpret the numerical simulation. Numerical simulation using ENVI-met was then applied to examine a series of urban design strategies, using the physiological equivalent temperature (PET) as the thermal comfort index. The result shows that an increase of 0.4 in the ground surface albedo overall reduces the thermal comfort, as indicated by an increase of 5-7°C in PET during the day with a marginal decrease of less than 1C at night. Increasing greenery cover, especially tree cover, improves thermal comfort during the whole period under evaluation. A reduction of up to 15°C in daytime PET is achieved by adding a dense tree cover (LAI = 6.4) over a grass lawn and up to 20°C by adding the tree cover over the hard pavement with an albedo of 0.2. © 2011 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Sydney, Faculty of Architecture. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.arch.usyd.edu.au/asr/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofArchitectural Science Reviewen_US
dc.subjectEnvi-Meten_US
dc.subjectEnvironmental Designen_US
dc.subjectPhysiological Equivalent Temperatureen_US
dc.subjectThermal Comforten_US
dc.subjectUrban Albedoen_US
dc.subjectVegetationen_US
dc.titleThermal comfort effects of urban design strategies in high-rise urban environments in a sub-tropical climateen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLau, SSY:ssylau@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLau, SSY=rp01006en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/00038628.2011.613646en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84860676709en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84860676709&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume54en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage285en_US
dc.identifier.epage304en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000298499800004-
dc.publisher.placeAustraliaen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYang, F=36607241700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, SSY=24734045900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridQian, F=35211614000en_US

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