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Article: Urban design to lower summertime outdoor temperatures: An empirical study on high-rise housing in Shanghai

TitleUrban design to lower summertime outdoor temperatures: An empirical study on high-rise housing in Shanghai
Authors
KeywordsBuilding Layout
Density
Environmental Design
Greenery
Heat Islands
Urban Climate Zone
Issue Date2011
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/buildenv
Citation
Building And Environment, 2011, v. 46 n. 3, p. 769-785 How to Cite?
AbstractThis research investigates the effect of urban design factors on summertime urban heat island (UHI) intensity. Ten high-rise residential quarters in the inner city of Shanghai were empirically investigated during mid July to mid August in 2008. On-site design variables were developed to quantify the thermal impacts from density, building layout and greenery. The design variables that were measured on site were correlated with the variation in UHI intensity during the day and night. The results show that variations in UHI are in part due to site planning, building design, and greenery. The overall daytime and nighttime UHI models explain up to 77 and 90 percent of UHI variation, respectively. On-site shading from either buildings or vegetation canopy is the most important factor influencing daytime UHI. The shading factor can distort and dilute behavior of other variables, e.g., green ratio and surface albedo. Nighttime UHI is more complicated due to the influence from anthropogenic heat, and is significantly related to greenery density and coverage. Based on the findings, potential design strategies are proposed in an effort to mitigate UHI, including manipulating building layout and mass to improve shading during the day while facilitating site ventilation at night and increasing site vegetation cover through strategic tree planting. Further recommendations for urban planning approaches to mitigate UHI on the urban scale are proposed. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/149387
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.394
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.121
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
HKU-UGC20200428
RGC-GRFHKU7293/04H
Funding Information:

The study is supported by the HKU-UGC Matching Grant Project No 20200428 and RGC-GRF research project HKU7293/04H Thanks are due to the student helpers from College of Architecture and Urban Planning (CAUP) Tongji University for their hard work in field campaign Lin Xiaodong Ren Guangyao Shi Tengfei Xu Wei Ye Chen Zhang Chengkai Zhou Zhenzhu and Zhu Liqian

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYang, Fen_US
dc.contributor.authorLau, SSYen_US
dc.contributor.authorQian, Fen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T05:52:50Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T05:52:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationBuilding And Environment, 2011, v. 46 n. 3, p. 769-785en_US
dc.identifier.issn0360-1323en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/149387-
dc.description.abstractThis research investigates the effect of urban design factors on summertime urban heat island (UHI) intensity. Ten high-rise residential quarters in the inner city of Shanghai were empirically investigated during mid July to mid August in 2008. On-site design variables were developed to quantify the thermal impacts from density, building layout and greenery. The design variables that were measured on site were correlated with the variation in UHI intensity during the day and night. The results show that variations in UHI are in part due to site planning, building design, and greenery. The overall daytime and nighttime UHI models explain up to 77 and 90 percent of UHI variation, respectively. On-site shading from either buildings or vegetation canopy is the most important factor influencing daytime UHI. The shading factor can distort and dilute behavior of other variables, e.g., green ratio and surface albedo. Nighttime UHI is more complicated due to the influence from anthropogenic heat, and is significantly related to greenery density and coverage. Based on the findings, potential design strategies are proposed in an effort to mitigate UHI, including manipulating building layout and mass to improve shading during the day while facilitating site ventilation at night and increasing site vegetation cover through strategic tree planting. Further recommendations for urban planning approaches to mitigate UHI on the urban scale are proposed. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/buildenven_US
dc.relation.ispartofBuilding and Environmenten_US
dc.subjectBuilding Layouten_US
dc.subjectDensityen_US
dc.subjectEnvironmental Designen_US
dc.subjectGreeneryen_US
dc.subjectHeat Islandsen_US
dc.subjectUrban Climate Zoneen_US
dc.titleUrban design to lower summertime outdoor temperatures: An empirical study on high-rise housing in Shanghaien_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLau, SSY:ssylau@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLau, SSY=rp01006en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.buildenv.2010.10.010en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-78649450167en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros195517-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-78649450167&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume46en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage769en_US
dc.identifier.epage785en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000285706400021-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYang, F=36607241700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, SSY=24734045900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridQian, F=35211614000en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike8070258-

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