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Article: Reconsidering daylighting design parameters for tall buildings in a densely built city

TitleReconsidering daylighting design parameters for tall buildings in a densely built city
Authors
KeywordsDaylight illuminance
Daylight simulation
High-rise housing
Kitchens
Preferences
Issue Date2006
PublisherUniversity of Sydney, Faculty of Architecture. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.arch.usyd.edu.au/asr/
Citation
Architectural Science Review, 2006, v. 49 n. 3, p. 285-294 How to Cite?
AbstractHong Kong presents a unique case of high-density living, featuring a compact urban form utilizing an extremely small percentage (21%) of total land area. Physically, the city is a mixing pot of commercial, office and residential buildings built along narrow streets, governed by a laissez-faire property market mechanism that reflects a mixed and intensive land-use pattern. The resultant urban form creates an unprecedented challenge for environmental amenities and in particular for daylight for skyscrapers. The paper discusses problems and underlying causes of daylight performance for kitchens under high-rise building scenarios. The kitchen is the subject of concern because it is claimed to be the worst lit space in prevailing high-rise building design. Besides focusing on socio-cultural expectations, the physical design of kitchens was examined critically, including the positioning, size and area of windows, reflectance and internal obstructions such as shelves and utility items, room area and room configuration. The concluding remarks make specific reference to socio-cultural factors concerning the usage of kitchens. It is the intention of this paper to use the kitchen as a proxy to illustrate the inherent problems and difficulties in directing daylight for different habitable spaces (bedrooms, living and dining rooms, as well as kitchens) in densely built, high-rise urban environments. © 2006 University of Sydney. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/149375
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.627

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLau, SSYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorBaharuddin, Ben_HK
dc.contributor.authorLee, WYWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, DKCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYe, AMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorAmato, Aen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChau, KWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, SKen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T05:52:42Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T05:52:42Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationArchitectural Science Review, 2006, v. 49 n. 3, p. 285-294en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0003-8628en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/149375-
dc.description.abstractHong Kong presents a unique case of high-density living, featuring a compact urban form utilizing an extremely small percentage (21%) of total land area. Physically, the city is a mixing pot of commercial, office and residential buildings built along narrow streets, governed by a laissez-faire property market mechanism that reflects a mixed and intensive land-use pattern. The resultant urban form creates an unprecedented challenge for environmental amenities and in particular for daylight for skyscrapers. The paper discusses problems and underlying causes of daylight performance for kitchens under high-rise building scenarios. The kitchen is the subject of concern because it is claimed to be the worst lit space in prevailing high-rise building design. Besides focusing on socio-cultural expectations, the physical design of kitchens was examined critically, including the positioning, size and area of windows, reflectance and internal obstructions such as shelves and utility items, room area and room configuration. The concluding remarks make specific reference to socio-cultural factors concerning the usage of kitchens. It is the intention of this paper to use the kitchen as a proxy to illustrate the inherent problems and difficulties in directing daylight for different habitable spaces (bedrooms, living and dining rooms, as well as kitchens) in densely built, high-rise urban environments. © 2006 University of Sydney. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Sydney, Faculty of Architecture. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.arch.usyd.edu.au/asr/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofArchitectural Science Reviewen_HK
dc.subjectDaylight illuminanceen_HK
dc.subjectDaylight simulationen_HK
dc.subjectHigh-rise housingen_HK
dc.subjectKitchensen_HK
dc.subjectPreferencesen_HK
dc.titleReconsidering daylighting design parameters for tall buildings in a densely built cityen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLau, SSY: ssylau@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailBaharuddin: baharsyah@yahoo.comen_HK
dc.identifier.emailYe, AM: arlenye@arch.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChau, KW: hrrbckw@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, SK: kelvin.wong@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLau, SSY=rp01006en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityBaharuddin=rp00990en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityYe, AM=rp01032en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChau, KW=rp00993en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, SK=rp01028en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3763/asre.2006.4938-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33749322791en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros115645-
dc.identifier.volume49en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage285en_HK
dc.identifier.epage294en_HK
dc.publisher.placeAustraliaen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, SSY=24734045900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBaharuddin=7409682695en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, WYW=7407088222en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, DKC=14054073000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYe, AM=7202048874en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAmato, A=7103136486en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChau, KW=24830082500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, SK=7404591021en_HK

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