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Article: Compromising building regulations and user expectations in the design of high-rise domestic kitchens

TitleCompromising building regulations and user expectations in the design of high-rise domestic kitchens
Authors
KeywordsNational cultures
People's Republic of China
Residential property
Rooms
Socialization
Structural design
Issue Date2006
PublisherEmerald Group Publishing Limited. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/ss.htm
Citation
Structural Survey, 2006, v. 24 n. 3, p. 212-229 How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose - The purpose of this paper is to discuss the significance and relevance of social and habitual behaviours of home occupants to the building design process. It argues that introducing quantitative measures such as daylight level alone may not result in a "healthy and functional" kitchen without appreciating or factoring-in the impacts of the social roles and user expectations of kitchens in high-rise and compact urban situations. Design/methodology/approach - The study investigated three common types of apartment buildings in Hong Kong. Case studies suggested that it is crucial to include in a design process proper considerations of human behaviours byway of preferred approaches andmodes of living, space usage, andweightings of end-user responses that would influence architectural design in a direct and crucial way. Findings - The study noted that daylight quality of a kitchen is perceived by most families to be not as important as building control officials and designers thought it would. Instead, it is found that social and cultural factors are more important parameters for users. The study observed that designers rely on physical and quantitative approaches such as daylight factor, window size and window-to-room area ratio to qualify a design solution and ignore the socio-cultural parameters. Originality/value - The paper calls for designers and building control officials to incorporate the study of functionality and socio-cultural preferences of users groups in the building design process. The study envisages that an integrated design methodology would enhance the living environment.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/149374
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.262
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLau, SSYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLi, FMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, DKCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTang, GWKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorBaharuddinen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYe, AMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChau, KWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, SKen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T05:52:40Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T05:52:40Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationStructural Survey, 2006, v. 24 n. 3, p. 212-229en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0263-080Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/149374-
dc.description.abstractPurpose - The purpose of this paper is to discuss the significance and relevance of social and habitual behaviours of home occupants to the building design process. It argues that introducing quantitative measures such as daylight level alone may not result in a "healthy and functional" kitchen without appreciating or factoring-in the impacts of the social roles and user expectations of kitchens in high-rise and compact urban situations. Design/methodology/approach - The study investigated three common types of apartment buildings in Hong Kong. Case studies suggested that it is crucial to include in a design process proper considerations of human behaviours byway of preferred approaches andmodes of living, space usage, andweightings of end-user responses that would influence architectural design in a direct and crucial way. Findings - The study noted that daylight quality of a kitchen is perceived by most families to be not as important as building control officials and designers thought it would. Instead, it is found that social and cultural factors are more important parameters for users. The study observed that designers rely on physical and quantitative approaches such as daylight factor, window size and window-to-room area ratio to qualify a design solution and ignore the socio-cultural parameters. Originality/value - The paper calls for designers and building control officials to incorporate the study of functionality and socio-cultural preferences of users groups in the building design process. The study envisages that an integrated design methodology would enhance the living environment.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherEmerald Group Publishing Limited. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/ss.htmen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofStructural Surveyen_HK
dc.subjectNational culturesen_HK
dc.subjectPeople's Republic of Chinaen_HK
dc.subjectResidential propertyen_HK
dc.subjectRoomsen_HK
dc.subjectSocializationen_HK
dc.subjectStructural designen_HK
dc.titleCompromising building regulations and user expectations in the design of high-rise domestic kitchensen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLau, SSY: ssylau@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailTang, GWK: yq@netvigator.comen_HK
dc.identifier.emailBaharuddin: baharsyah@yahoo.comen_HK
dc.identifier.emailYe, AM: arlenye@arch.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChau, KW: hrrbckw@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, SK: kelvin.wong@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLau, SSY=rp01006en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityBaharuddin=rp00990en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityYe, AL=rp01032en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChau, KW=rp00993en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, SK=rp01028en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1108/02630800610678869en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33746629484en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros127627-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33746629484&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume24en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage212en_HK
dc.identifier.epage229en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, SSY=24734045900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, FM=14054225200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, DKC=14054073000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTang, GWK=36882461200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBaharuddin=7409682695en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYe, AL=7202048874en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChau, KW=24830082500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, SK=7404591021en_HK

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