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Article: Spaces of exclusion: The significance of cultural identity in the formation of European residential districts in British Hong Kong, 1877 - 1904

TitleSpaces of exclusion: The significance of cultural identity in the formation of European residential districts in British Hong Kong, 1877 - 1904
Authors
Issue Date2003
PublisherPion Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.envplan.com
Citation
Environment And Planning D: Society And Space, 2003, v. 21 n. 2, p. 223-252 How to Cite?
AbstractIn this paper we discuss the role and significance of European cultural identity in the formation of the urban environment in 19th-century and early-20th-century British Hong Kong. Our purpose is to offer an alternative reading of the social history of Hong Kong-the orthodox accounts of which remain largely predominant in the general historical understanding of that society-by examining the machinations that surrounded attempts by the European colonial elite to control the production of urban form and space in the capital city of Hong Kong, Victoria. Here the European Residential District ordinance of 1888 (along with other related ordinances) is considered in detail. An examination of European cultural self-perception and the construction of colonial identity is made by considering not only the actual ways in which urban form and space were manipulated through these ordinances but also the visual representation of the city in art. Here the intersection between ideas and images concerning civil society, cultural identity, architecture, and the official practices of colonial urban planning is demonstrated. It is argued that this coalescing of ideas, images, and practices in the colonial environment of British Hong Kong not only led to the racialisation of urban form and space there but also contributed to the apparent anxiety exhibited by the European population over the preservation of their own identity through the immediacy of the built environment.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/149367
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.659
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.957
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBremner, GAen_US
dc.contributor.authorLung, DPYen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T05:52:34Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T05:52:34Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.identifier.citationEnvironment And Planning D: Society And Space, 2003, v. 21 n. 2, p. 223-252en_US
dc.identifier.issn0263-7758en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/149367-
dc.description.abstractIn this paper we discuss the role and significance of European cultural identity in the formation of the urban environment in 19th-century and early-20th-century British Hong Kong. Our purpose is to offer an alternative reading of the social history of Hong Kong-the orthodox accounts of which remain largely predominant in the general historical understanding of that society-by examining the machinations that surrounded attempts by the European colonial elite to control the production of urban form and space in the capital city of Hong Kong, Victoria. Here the European Residential District ordinance of 1888 (along with other related ordinances) is considered in detail. An examination of European cultural self-perception and the construction of colonial identity is made by considering not only the actual ways in which urban form and space were manipulated through these ordinances but also the visual representation of the city in art. Here the intersection between ideas and images concerning civil society, cultural identity, architecture, and the official practices of colonial urban planning is demonstrated. It is argued that this coalescing of ideas, images, and practices in the colonial environment of British Hong Kong not only led to the racialisation of urban form and space there but also contributed to the apparent anxiety exhibited by the European population over the preservation of their own identity through the immediacy of the built environment.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPion Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.envplan.comen_US
dc.relation.ispartofEnvironment and Planning D: Society and Spaceen_US
dc.titleSpaces of exclusion: The significance of cultural identity in the formation of European residential districts in British Hong Kong, 1877 - 1904en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLung, DPY:dpylung@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLung, DPY=rp01012en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1068/d310en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0038191022en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0038191022&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume21en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage223en_US
dc.identifier.epage252en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000182513200010-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBremner, GA=6602577887en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLung, DPY=6602686878en_US

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