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Article: Density control and the quality of living space: A case study of private housing development in Hong Kong

TitleDensity control and the quality of living space: A case study of private housing development in Hong Kong
Authors
KeywordsDensity control
Hong Kong
Housing quality
Residential development
Issue Date2002
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/habitatint
Citation
Habitat International, 2002, v. 26 n. 2, p. 159-175 How to Cite?
AbstractThe increased concentration of urban populations is a global phenomenon. Hong Kong, like many Asian cities such as Singapore, Tokyo, and Shanghai, is famous for its compactness and high-density living. This paper argues that Hong Kong's floor area control mechanism has a major adverse effect on the development potential of private housing, and more importantly on the quality of living space. Private residential buildings are built in accordance with statutory requirements imposed by the government. Under the current system, private developers attempt to maximize the usable floor area efficiency at the expense of common area. Consequently, building layouts generate the maximum number of housing units clustered around a cruciform, high-rise compact core. The built form does not take adequate consideration of living quality issues. Its undesirable impacts notwithstanding, the dense cruciform floor plate design is now widely replicated in many mainland Chinese cities. This paper argues that, although such a built form appears modern to some city dwellers, it is a direct result of an outdated density control mechanism that fails to meet present day requirements. A review of this mechanism should be undertaken, and this paper suggests some possible solutions to strike a balance between dense living and a better environment. © 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/149364
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.029
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.038
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, EHWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTang, BSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, WSen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T05:52:33Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T05:52:33Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_HK
dc.identifier.citationHabitat International, 2002, v. 26 n. 2, p. 159-175en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0197-3975en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/149364-
dc.description.abstractThe increased concentration of urban populations is a global phenomenon. Hong Kong, like many Asian cities such as Singapore, Tokyo, and Shanghai, is famous for its compactness and high-density living. This paper argues that Hong Kong's floor area control mechanism has a major adverse effect on the development potential of private housing, and more importantly on the quality of living space. Private residential buildings are built in accordance with statutory requirements imposed by the government. Under the current system, private developers attempt to maximize the usable floor area efficiency at the expense of common area. Consequently, building layouts generate the maximum number of housing units clustered around a cruciform, high-rise compact core. The built form does not take adequate consideration of living quality issues. Its undesirable impacts notwithstanding, the dense cruciform floor plate design is now widely replicated in many mainland Chinese cities. This paper argues that, although such a built form appears modern to some city dwellers, it is a direct result of an outdated density control mechanism that fails to meet present day requirements. A review of this mechanism should be undertaken, and this paper suggests some possible solutions to strike a balance between dense living and a better environment. © 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/habitatinten_HK
dc.relation.ispartofHabitat Internationalen_HK
dc.subjectDensity controlen_HK
dc.subjectHong Kongen_HK
dc.subjectHousing qualityen_HK
dc.subjectResidential developmenten_HK
dc.titleDensity control and the quality of living space: A case study of private housing development in Hong Kongen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailTang, BS: bsbstang@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, WS: wswong@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityTang, BS=rp01646en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, WS=rp01029en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0197-3975(01)00041-8en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0036128959en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0036128959&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume26en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage159en_HK
dc.identifier.epage175en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000174404200002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, EHW=7401994053en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTang, BS=7402560881en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, WS=16508005400en_HK

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