File Download
  • No File Attached
 
Links for fulltext
(May Require Subscription)
 
Supplementary

Article: A 23-lamp helidon
  • Basic View
  • Metadata View
  • XML View
TitleA 23-lamp helidon
 
AuthorsCheung, KP1
Kam, HM2
Chung, SL2
Lam, CF2
 
KeywordsHelidon
Sunlight
Buildings
Daylight simulation
Daylighting
 
Issue Date1999
 
PublisherUniversity of Sydney, Faculty of Architecture. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.arch.usyd.edu.au/asr/
 
CitationArchitectural Science Review, 1999, v. 42 n. 1, p. 49-53 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00038628.1999.9696848
 
AbstractHeliodons have been developed to simulate sunlight direction in relation to a building model. For placing the building model, heliodons can be divided into two categories. In one category, the model is to be tilted and normally also rotated [1, 2, 3]. In the other category, the model is to be placed horizontally and normally also stationary [4, 5, 6]. The later category of heliodons, with a horizontally placed building model, and with the simulated sunlight moving around it, will certainly help architectural students, to visualise the change of sunlight direction around a building and the related effect on insolation and shading. This category has appeared in architectural schools in two versions, namely a movable, single-lamp version [4], and a multi-lamp version with lamps fixed to stationary supports to simulate sunlight direction at selected day/time combinations [5]. This paper reports on a hybrid version between these two versions. This hybrid version consists of 23 lamps (i.e. for day selection) fixed on a rotatable elbow (i.e. for time selection), which is in turn mounted on a tiltable (i.e. for latitude selection) turntable.
 
ISSN0003-8628
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.348
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00038628.1999.9696848
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorCheung, KP
 
dc.contributor.authorKam, HM
 
dc.contributor.authorChung, SL
 
dc.contributor.authorLam, CF
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T05:52:31Z
 
dc.date.available2012-06-26T05:52:31Z
 
dc.date.issued1999
 
dc.description.abstractHeliodons have been developed to simulate sunlight direction in relation to a building model. For placing the building model, heliodons can be divided into two categories. In one category, the model is to be tilted and normally also rotated [1, 2, 3]. In the other category, the model is to be placed horizontally and normally also stationary [4, 5, 6]. The later category of heliodons, with a horizontally placed building model, and with the simulated sunlight moving around it, will certainly help architectural students, to visualise the change of sunlight direction around a building and the related effect on insolation and shading. This category has appeared in architectural schools in two versions, namely a movable, single-lamp version [4], and a multi-lamp version with lamps fixed to stationary supports to simulate sunlight direction at selected day/time combinations [5]. This paper reports on a hybrid version between these two versions. This hybrid version consists of 23 lamps (i.e. for day selection) fixed on a rotatable elbow (i.e. for time selection), which is in turn mounted on a tiltable (i.e. for latitude selection) turntable.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationArchitectural Science Review, 1999, v. 42 n. 1, p. 49-53 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00038628.1999.9696848
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00038628.1999.9696848
 
dc.identifier.epage53
 
dc.identifier.hkuros42225
 
dc.identifier.issn0003-8628
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.348
 
dc.identifier.issue1
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0033097384
 
dc.identifier.spage49
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/149362
 
dc.identifier.volume42
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherUniversity of Sydney, Faculty of Architecture. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.arch.usyd.edu.au/asr/
 
dc.publisher.placeAustralia
 
dc.relation.ispartofArchitectural Science Review
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subjectHelidon
 
dc.subjectSunlight
 
dc.subjectBuildings
 
dc.subjectDaylight simulation
 
dc.subjectDaylighting
 
dc.titleA 23-lamp helidon
 
dc.typeArticle
 
<?xml encoding="utf-8" version="1.0"?>
<item><contributor.author>Cheung, KP</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Kam, HM</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Chung, SL</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Lam, CF</contributor.author>
<date.accessioned>2012-06-26T05:52:31Z</date.accessioned>
<date.available>2012-06-26T05:52:31Z</date.available>
<date.issued>1999</date.issued>
<identifier.citation>Architectural Science Review, 1999, v. 42 n. 1, p. 49-53</identifier.citation>
<identifier.issn>0003-8628</identifier.issn>
<identifier.uri>http://hdl.handle.net/10722/149362</identifier.uri>
<description.abstract>Heliodons have been developed to simulate sunlight direction in relation to a building model. For placing the building model, heliodons can be divided into two categories. In one category, the model is to be tilted and normally also rotated [1, 2, 3]. In the other category, the model is to be placed horizontally and normally also stationary [4, 5, 6]. The later category of heliodons, with a horizontally placed building model, and with the simulated sunlight moving around it, will certainly help architectural students, to visualise the change of sunlight direction around a building and the related effect on insolation and shading. This category has appeared in architectural schools in two versions, namely a movable, single-lamp version [4], and a multi-lamp version with lamps fixed to stationary supports to simulate sunlight direction at selected day/time combinations [5]. This paper reports on a hybrid version between these two versions. This hybrid version consists of 23 lamps (i.e. for day selection) fixed on a rotatable elbow (i.e. for time selection), which is in turn mounted on a tiltable (i.e. for latitude selection) turntable.</description.abstract>
<language>eng</language>
<publisher>University of Sydney, Faculty of Architecture. The Journal&apos;s web site is located at http://www.arch.usyd.edu.au/asr/</publisher>
<relation.ispartof>Architectural Science Review</relation.ispartof>
<subject>Helidon</subject>
<subject>Sunlight</subject>
<subject>Buildings</subject>
<subject>Daylight simulation</subject>
<subject>Daylighting</subject>
<title>A 23-lamp helidon</title>
<type>Article</type>
<description.nature>Link_to_subscribed_fulltext</description.nature>
<identifier.doi>10.1080/00038628.1999.9696848</identifier.doi>
<identifier.scopus>eid_2-s2.0-0033097384</identifier.scopus>
<identifier.hkuros>42225</identifier.hkuros>
<relation.references>http://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0033097384&amp;selection=ref&amp;src=s&amp;origin=recordpage</relation.references>
<identifier.volume>42</identifier.volume>
<identifier.issue>1</identifier.issue>
<identifier.spage>49</identifier.spage>
<identifier.epage>53</identifier.epage>
<publisher.place>Australia</publisher.place>
</item>
Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. Tuen Mun School Dental Clinic