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Article: Life-course origins of social inequalities in adult immune cell markers of inflammation in a developing southern Chinese population: the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study

TitleLife-course origins of social inequalities in adult immune cell markers of inflammation in a developing southern Chinese population: the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study
Authors
Issue Date2012
PublisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcpublichealth/
Citation
BMC Public Health, 2012, v. 12, article no. 269 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND: Socioeconomic position (SEP) throughout life is associated with cardiovascular disease, though the mechanisms linking these two are unclear. It is also unclear whether there are critical periods in the life course when exposure to better socioeconomic conditions confers advantages or whether SEP exposures accumulate across the whole life course. Inflammation may be a mechanism linking socioeconomic position (SEP) with cardiovascular disease. In a large sample of older residents of Guangzhou, in southern China, we examined the association of life course SEP with inflammation. METHODS: In baseline data on 9,981 adults (>/= 50 years old) from the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study (2006-08), we used multivariable linear regression and model fit to assess the associations of life course SEP at four stages (childhood, early adult, late adult and current) with white blood, granulocyte and lymphocyte cell counts. RESULTS: A model including SEP at all four life stages best explained the association of life course SEP with white blood and granulocyte cell count for men and women, with early adult SEP (education) making the largest contribution. A critical period model best explained the association of life course SEP with lymphocyte count, with sex-specific associations. Early adult SEP was negatively associated with lymphocytes for women. CONCLUSIONS: Low SEP throughout life may negatively impact late adult immune-inflammatory status. However, some aspects of immune-inflammatory status may be sensitive to earlier exposures, with sex-specific associations. The findings were compatible with the hypothesis that in a developing population, upregulation of the gonadotropic axis with economic development may obscure the normally protective effects of social advantage for men.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/149178
ISSN
2014 Impact Factor: 2.264
2014 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.139
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
University of Hong Kong Foundation for Development and Research, Hong Kong
University of Hong Kong University Research Committee Strategic Research Theme Public Health, Hong Kong
Guangzhou Public Health Bureau
University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK
Leverhulme Trust, UK
Guangzhou Science and Technology Committee, Guangzhou, China
Funding Information:

The Guangzhou Cohort Study investigators include: Guangzhou No. 12 Hospital: WS Zhang, M Cao, T Zhu, B Liu, CQ Jiang (Co-PI); The University of Hong Kong: CM Schooling, SM McGhee, GM Leung, R Fielding, TH Lam (Co-PI); The University of Birmingham: P Adab, GN Thomas, KK Cheng (Co-PI). This work was supported by the University of Hong Kong Foundation for Development and Research, Hong Kong; The University of Hong Kong University Research Committee Strategic Research Theme Public Health, Hong Kong; Guangzhou Public Health Bureau, and Guangzhou Science and Technology Committee, Guangzhou, China; and The University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript. TM Elwell-Sutton was supported by a studentship from the Leverhulme Trust, UK.

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWest, DAen_US
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GMen_US
dc.contributor.authorJiang, CQen_US
dc.contributor.authorElwell-Sutton, TMen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhang, WSen_US
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_US
dc.contributor.authorCheng, KKen_US
dc.contributor.authorSchooling, CMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-22T06:27:47Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-22T06:27:47Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationBMC Public Health, 2012, v. 12, article no. 269en_US
dc.identifier.issn1471-2458-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/149178-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Socioeconomic position (SEP) throughout life is associated with cardiovascular disease, though the mechanisms linking these two are unclear. It is also unclear whether there are critical periods in the life course when exposure to better socioeconomic conditions confers advantages or whether SEP exposures accumulate across the whole life course. Inflammation may be a mechanism linking socioeconomic position (SEP) with cardiovascular disease. In a large sample of older residents of Guangzhou, in southern China, we examined the association of life course SEP with inflammation. METHODS: In baseline data on 9,981 adults (>/= 50 years old) from the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study (2006-08), we used multivariable linear regression and model fit to assess the associations of life course SEP at four stages (childhood, early adult, late adult and current) with white blood, granulocyte and lymphocyte cell counts. RESULTS: A model including SEP at all four life stages best explained the association of life course SEP with white blood and granulocyte cell count for men and women, with early adult SEP (education) making the largest contribution. A critical period model best explained the association of life course SEP with lymphocyte count, with sex-specific associations. Early adult SEP was negatively associated with lymphocytes for women. CONCLUSIONS: Low SEP throughout life may negatively impact late adult immune-inflammatory status. However, some aspects of immune-inflammatory status may be sensitive to earlier exposures, with sex-specific associations. The findings were compatible with the hypothesis that in a developing population, upregulation of the gonadotropic axis with economic development may obscure the normally protective effects of social advantage for men.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcpublichealth/-
dc.relation.ispartofBMC Public Healthen_US
dc.rightsBMC Public Health. Copyright © BioMed Central Ltd.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleLife-course origins of social inequalities in adult immune cell markers of inflammation in a developing southern Chinese population: the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Studyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM: gmleung@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH: hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailSchooling, CM: cms1@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460en_US
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_US
dc.identifier.authoritySchooling, CM=rp00504en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1471-2458-12-269-
dc.identifier.pmid22472036-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3373375-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84859207843-
dc.identifier.hkuros200324en_US
dc.identifier.volume12, article no. 269en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000305156900001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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