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Article: Ultrasound-Microbubble Mediated Cavitation of Plant Cells: Effects on Morphology and Viability

TitleUltrasound-Microbubble Mediated Cavitation of Plant Cells: Effects on Morphology and Viability
Authors
KeywordsBioeffects
Cell death mode
Morphology
Plant cells
Ultrasound-microbubble mediated cavitation
Viability
Issue Date2012
PublisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ultrasmedbio
Citation
Ultrasound In Medicine And Biology, 2012, v. 38 n. 6, p. 1085-1096 How to Cite?
AbstractThe interaction between ultrasound pulses and microbubbles is known to generate acoustic cavitation that may puncture biological cells. This work presents new experimental findings on the bioeffects of ultrasound-microbubble mediated cavitation in plant cells with emphasis on direct observations of morphological impact and analysis of viability trends in tobacco BY-2 cells that are widely studied in higher plant physiology. The tobacco cell suspensions were exposed to 1 MHz ultrasound pulses in the presence of 1% v/v microbubbles (10% duty cycle; 1 kHz pulse repetition frequency; 70 mm between probe and cells; 1-min exposure time). Few bioeffects were observed at low peak negative pressures (<0.4 MPa) where stable cavitation presumably occurred. In contrast, at 0.9 MPa peak negative pressure (with more inertial cavitation activities according to our passive cavitation detection results), random pores were found on tobacco cell wall (observed via scanning electron microscopy) and enhanced exogenous uptake into the cytoplasm was evident (noted in our fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran uptake analysis). Also, instant lysis was observed in 23.4% of cells (found using trypan blue staining) and programmed cell death was seen in 23.3% of population after 12 h (determined by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick end labeling [TUNEL]). These bioeffects generally correspond in trend with those for mammalian cells. This raises the possibility of developing ultrasound-microbubble mediated cavitation into a targeted gene transfection paradigm for plant cells and, conversely, adopting plant cells as experimental test-beds for sonoporation-based gene therapy in mammalian cells. © 2012 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/149083
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.298
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.885
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorQin, Pen_HK
dc.contributor.authorXu, Len_HK
dc.contributor.authorZhong, Wen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYu, ACHen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-22T06:20:45Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-22T06:20:45Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_HK
dc.identifier.citationUltrasound In Medicine And Biology, 2012, v. 38 n. 6, p. 1085-1096en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0301-5629en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/149083-
dc.description.abstractThe interaction between ultrasound pulses and microbubbles is known to generate acoustic cavitation that may puncture biological cells. This work presents new experimental findings on the bioeffects of ultrasound-microbubble mediated cavitation in plant cells with emphasis on direct observations of morphological impact and analysis of viability trends in tobacco BY-2 cells that are widely studied in higher plant physiology. The tobacco cell suspensions were exposed to 1 MHz ultrasound pulses in the presence of 1% v/v microbubbles (10% duty cycle; 1 kHz pulse repetition frequency; 70 mm between probe and cells; 1-min exposure time). Few bioeffects were observed at low peak negative pressures (<0.4 MPa) where stable cavitation presumably occurred. In contrast, at 0.9 MPa peak negative pressure (with more inertial cavitation activities according to our passive cavitation detection results), random pores were found on tobacco cell wall (observed via scanning electron microscopy) and enhanced exogenous uptake into the cytoplasm was evident (noted in our fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran uptake analysis). Also, instant lysis was observed in 23.4% of cells (found using trypan blue staining) and programmed cell death was seen in 23.3% of population after 12 h (determined by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick end labeling [TUNEL]). These bioeffects generally correspond in trend with those for mammalian cells. This raises the possibility of developing ultrasound-microbubble mediated cavitation into a targeted gene transfection paradigm for plant cells and, conversely, adopting plant cells as experimental test-beds for sonoporation-based gene therapy in mammalian cells. © 2012 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ultrasmedbioen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofUltrasound in Medicine and Biologyen_HK
dc.subjectBioeffectsen_HK
dc.subjectCell death modeen_HK
dc.subjectMorphologyen_HK
dc.subjectPlant cellsen_HK
dc.subjectUltrasound-microbubble mediated cavitationen_HK
dc.subjectViabilityen_HK
dc.titleUltrasound-Microbubble Mediated Cavitation of Plant Cells: Effects on Morphology and Viabilityen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailYu, ACH:alfred.yu@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityYu, ACH=rp00657en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ultrasmedbio.2012.02.017en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid22502880-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84860458155en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros199914en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84860458155&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume38en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1085en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1096en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1879-291X-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000303667700021-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridQin, P=55178373500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridXu, L=54973918600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhong, W=46761637400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYu, ACH=8699317700en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike10620933-

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