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Article: Multidisciplinary studies in environmental archaeology with particular reference to China: an introduction to the special issue
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TitleMultidisciplinary studies in environmental archaeology with particular reference to China: an introduction to the special issue
 
AuthorsZong, Y1
Chen, Z3
Yu, Z2
 
KeywordsChina
Climate change
Coast
Early rice exploitation
Environmental archaeology
Holocene
Lake
 
Issue Date2012
 
PublisherSage Publications Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://hol.sagepub.com
 
CitationThe Holocene, 2012, v. 22 n. 6, p. 609-611 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0959683611429834
 
AbstractAn important focus in research over the past decade is the relationship between climatic/environmental change and human cultural evolution during the Holocene. This decade saw an increasing number of natural scientists involved in this research, which led to debates and collaborations between natural scientists and archaeologists/anthropologists. This decade also witnessed an increase in multidisciplinary research across these subjects, which has improved significantly the understanding of the human-environment relationship. As part of this research drive, this Special Issue highlights the importance of multidisciplinary studies, mainly from China, on early rice agriculture, impacts of environmental change in Neolithic communities, and new approaches for environmental reconstruction. © The Author(s) 2012.
 
ISSN0959-6836
2012 Impact Factor: 3.218
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.515
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0959683611429834
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000304238500001
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorZong, Y
 
dc.contributor.authorChen, Z
 
dc.contributor.authorYu, Z
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-22T06:20:33Z
 
dc.date.available2012-06-22T06:20:33Z
 
dc.date.issued2012
 
dc.description.abstractAn important focus in research over the past decade is the relationship between climatic/environmental change and human cultural evolution during the Holocene. This decade saw an increasing number of natural scientists involved in this research, which led to debates and collaborations between natural scientists and archaeologists/anthropologists. This decade also witnessed an increase in multidisciplinary research across these subjects, which has improved significantly the understanding of the human-environment relationship. As part of this research drive, this Special Issue highlights the importance of multidisciplinary studies, mainly from China, on early rice agriculture, impacts of environmental change in Neolithic communities, and new approaches for environmental reconstruction. © The Author(s) 2012.
 
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version
 
dc.identifier.citationThe Holocene, 2012, v. 22 n. 6, p. 609-611 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0959683611429834
 
dc.identifier.citeulike10839782
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0959683611429834
 
dc.identifier.epage611
 
dc.identifier.hkuros200201
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000304238500001
 
dc.identifier.issn0959-6836
2012 Impact Factor: 3.218
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.515
 
dc.identifier.issue6
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84861795961
 
dc.identifier.spage609
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/149080
 
dc.identifier.volume22
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherSage Publications Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://hol.sagepub.com
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofThe Holocene
 
dc.rightsThe Holocene. Copyright © The Author(s).
 
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License
 
dc.subjectChina
 
dc.subjectClimate change
 
dc.subjectCoast
 
dc.subjectEarly rice exploitation
 
dc.subjectEnvironmental archaeology
 
dc.subjectHolocene
 
dc.subjectLake
 
dc.titleMultidisciplinary studies in environmental archaeology with particular reference to China: an introduction to the special issue
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Chen, Z</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Yu, Z</contributor.author>
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<description.abstract>An important focus in research over the past decade is the relationship between climatic/environmental change and human cultural evolution during the Holocene. This decade saw an increasing number of natural scientists involved in this research, which led to debates and collaborations between natural scientists and archaeologists/anthropologists. This decade also witnessed an increase in multidisciplinary research across these subjects, which has improved significantly the understanding of the human-environment relationship. As part of this research drive, this Special Issue highlights the importance of multidisciplinary studies, mainly from China, on early rice agriculture, impacts of environmental change in Neolithic communities, and new approaches for environmental reconstruction. &#169; The Author(s) 2012.</description.abstract>
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<subject>China</subject>
<subject>Climate change</subject>
<subject>Coast</subject>
<subject>Early rice exploitation</subject>
<subject>Environmental archaeology</subject>
<subject>Holocene</subject>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. Lehigh University
  3. East China Normal University