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Article: Adiposity, its related biologic risk factors, and suicide: a cohort study of 542,088 Taiwanese adults
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TitleAdiposity, its related biologic risk factors, and suicide: a cohort study of 542,088 Taiwanese adults
 
AuthorsChang, SS5 3 1
Wen, CP2 4
Tsai, MK2 4
Lawlor, DA5
Yang, YC2 4
Gunnell, D5
 
Issue Date2012
 
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://aje.oxfordjournals.org/
 
CitationAmerican Journal of Epidemiology, 2012, v. 175 n. 8, p. 804-815 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwr386
 
AbstractRecent studies in Western nations have shown inverse associations between body mass index (BMI, measured as weight (kg)/height (m)(2)) and suicide. However, it is uncertain whether the association is similar in non-Western settings, and the biologic pathways underlying the association are unclear. The authors investigated these issues in a cohort of 542,088 Taiwanese people 20 years of age or older who participated in a health check-up program (1994-2008); there were 573 suicides over a mean 8.1 years of follow up. There was a J-shaped association between BMI and suicide risk (P for the quadratic term = 0.033) but limited evidence of a linear association (adjusted hazard ratio per 1-standard-deviation increase = 0.95 (95% confidence interval: 0.85, 1.06)); compared with individuals whose BMI was 18.5-22.9, adjusted hazard ratios for those with a BMI <18.5 or >/=35 were 1.56 (95% confidence interval: 1.07, 2.28) and 3.62 (95% confidence interval: 1.59, 8.22), respectively. A high waist-to-hip ratio was associated with an increased risk of suicide. There was some evidence for a reverse J-shaped association of systolic blood pressure and high density lipoprotein cholesterol with suicide and an association of higher triglyceride level with increased suicide risk; these associations did not appear to mediate the associations of BMI and waist-to-hip ratio with suicide.
 
ISSN0002-9262
2012 Impact Factor: 4.78
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.347
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwr386
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000302806300010
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Taiwan Department of Health Clinical Trial and Research Center of ExcellenceDOH101-TD-B-111-004
National Science Council, TaiwanNSC-98-2917-I-564-162
United Kingdom Medical Research CouncilG0600705
University of Bristol
Funding Information:

This study was in part supported by a grant from the Taiwan Department of Health Clinical Trial and Research Center of Excellence (DOH101-TD-B-111-004) and institutional support from the National Health Research Institutes, Taiwan. Dr. Shu-Sen Chang's fellowship is funded by the National Science Council, Taiwan (NSC-98-2917-I-564-162). Dr. David Gunnell is a United Kingdom National Institute for Health Research Senior Investigator. Dr. Debbie A. Lawlor works in a center that receives support from the United Kingdom Medical Research Council (grant G0600705) and the University of Bristol.

 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorChang, SS
 
dc.contributor.authorWen, CP
 
dc.contributor.authorTsai, MK
 
dc.contributor.authorLawlor, DA
 
dc.contributor.authorYang, YC
 
dc.contributor.authorGunnell, D
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-15T03:51:54Z
 
dc.date.available2012-06-15T03:51:54Z
 
dc.date.issued2012
 
dc.description.abstractRecent studies in Western nations have shown inverse associations between body mass index (BMI, measured as weight (kg)/height (m)(2)) and suicide. However, it is uncertain whether the association is similar in non-Western settings, and the biologic pathways underlying the association are unclear. The authors investigated these issues in a cohort of 542,088 Taiwanese people 20 years of age or older who participated in a health check-up program (1994-2008); there were 573 suicides over a mean 8.1 years of follow up. There was a J-shaped association between BMI and suicide risk (P for the quadratic term = 0.033) but limited evidence of a linear association (adjusted hazard ratio per 1-standard-deviation increase = 0.95 (95% confidence interval: 0.85, 1.06)); compared with individuals whose BMI was 18.5-22.9, adjusted hazard ratios for those with a BMI <18.5 or >/=35 were 1.56 (95% confidence interval: 1.07, 2.28) and 3.62 (95% confidence interval: 1.59, 8.22), respectively. A high waist-to-hip ratio was associated with an increased risk of suicide. There was some evidence for a reverse J-shaped association of systolic blood pressure and high density lipoprotein cholesterol with suicide and an association of higher triglyceride level with increased suicide risk; these associations did not appear to mediate the associations of BMI and waist-to-hip ratio with suicide.
 
dc.description.naturepostprint
 
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Journal of Epidemiology, 2012, v. 175 n. 8, p. 804-815 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwr386
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwr386
 
dc.identifier.epage815
 
dc.identifier.hkuros211095
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000302806300010
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Taiwan Department of Health Clinical Trial and Research Center of ExcellenceDOH101-TD-B-111-004
National Science Council, TaiwanNSC-98-2917-I-564-162
United Kingdom Medical Research CouncilG0600705
University of Bristol
Funding Information:

This study was in part supported by a grant from the Taiwan Department of Health Clinical Trial and Research Center of Excellence (DOH101-TD-B-111-004) and institutional support from the National Health Research Institutes, Taiwan. Dr. Shu-Sen Chang's fellowship is funded by the National Science Council, Taiwan (NSC-98-2917-I-564-162). Dr. David Gunnell is a United Kingdom National Institute for Health Research Senior Investigator. Dr. Debbie A. Lawlor works in a center that receives support from the United Kingdom Medical Research Council (grant G0600705) and the University of Bristol.

 
dc.identifier.issn0002-9262
2012 Impact Factor: 4.78
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.347
 
dc.identifier.issue8
 
dc.identifier.pmid22427611
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84859710614
 
dc.identifier.spage804
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/148854
 
dc.identifier.volume175
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://aje.oxfordjournals.org/
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican Journal of Epidemiology
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsThis is a pre-copy-editing, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in American Journal of Epidemiology following peer review. The definitive publisher-authenticated version American Journal of Epidemiology, 2012, v. 175 n. 8, p. 804-815 is available online at: http://aje.oxfordjournals.org/content/175/8/804
 
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License
 
dc.subject.meshAdiposity
 
dc.subject.meshBlood Pressure
 
dc.subject.meshBody Mass Index
 
dc.subject.meshCholesterol - blood
 
dc.subject.meshSuicide - statistics and numerical data
 
dc.titleAdiposity, its related biologic risk factors, and suicide: a cohort study of 542,088 Taiwanese adults
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. China Medical University Hospital Taichung
  3. Ju Shan Hospital
  4. National Health Research Institutes Taiwan
  5. University of Bristol