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Article: Adiposity, its related biologic risk factors, and suicide: a cohort study of 542,088 Taiwanese adults

TitleAdiposity, its related biologic risk factors, and suicide: a cohort study of 542,088 Taiwanese adults
Authors
Issue Date2012
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://aje.oxfordjournals.org/
Citation
American Journal of Epidemiology, 2012, v. 175 n. 8, p. 804-815 How to Cite?
Abstract
Recent studies in Western nations have shown inverse associations between body mass index (BMI, measured as weight (kg)/height (m)(2)) and suicide. However, it is uncertain whether the association is similar in non-Western settings, and the biologic pathways underlying the association are unclear. The authors investigated these issues in a cohort of 542,088 Taiwanese people 20 years of age or older who participated in a health check-up program (1994-2008); there were 573 suicides over a mean 8.1 years of follow up. There was a J-shaped association between BMI and suicide risk (P for the quadratic term = 0.033) but limited evidence of a linear association (adjusted hazard ratio per 1-standard-deviation increase = 0.95 (95% confidence interval: 0.85, 1.06)); compared with individuals whose BMI was 18.5-22.9, adjusted hazard ratios for those with a BMI <18.5 or >/=35 were 1.56 (95% confidence interval: 1.07, 2.28) and 3.62 (95% confidence interval: 1.59, 8.22), respectively. A high waist-to-hip ratio was associated with an increased risk of suicide. There was some evidence for a reverse J-shaped association of systolic blood pressure and high density lipoprotein cholesterol with suicide and an association of higher triglyceride level with increased suicide risk; these associations did not appear to mediate the associations of BMI and waist-to-hip ratio with suicide.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/148854
ISSN
2013 Impact Factor: 4.975
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Taiwan Department of Health Clinical Trial and Research Center of ExcellenceDOH101-TD-B-111-004
National Science Council, TaiwanNSC-98-2917-I-564-162
United Kingdom Medical Research CouncilG0600705
University of Bristol
Funding Information:

This study was in part supported by a grant from the Taiwan Department of Health Clinical Trial and Research Center of Excellence (DOH101-TD-B-111-004) and institutional support from the National Health Research Institutes, Taiwan. Dr. Shu-Sen Chang's fellowship is funded by the National Science Council, Taiwan (NSC-98-2917-I-564-162). Dr. David Gunnell is a United Kingdom National Institute for Health Research Senior Investigator. Dr. Debbie A. Lawlor works in a center that receives support from the United Kingdom Medical Research Council (grant G0600705) and the University of Bristol.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChang, SSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWen, CPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTsai, MKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLawlor, DAen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYang, YCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorGunnell, Den_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-15T03:51:54Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-15T03:51:54Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Journal of Epidemiology, 2012, v. 175 n. 8, p. 804-815en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0002-9262en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/148854-
dc.description.abstractRecent studies in Western nations have shown inverse associations between body mass index (BMI, measured as weight (kg)/height (m)(2)) and suicide. However, it is uncertain whether the association is similar in non-Western settings, and the biologic pathways underlying the association are unclear. The authors investigated these issues in a cohort of 542,088 Taiwanese people 20 years of age or older who participated in a health check-up program (1994-2008); there were 573 suicides over a mean 8.1 years of follow up. There was a J-shaped association between BMI and suicide risk (P for the quadratic term = 0.033) but limited evidence of a linear association (adjusted hazard ratio per 1-standard-deviation increase = 0.95 (95% confidence interval: 0.85, 1.06)); compared with individuals whose BMI was 18.5-22.9, adjusted hazard ratios for those with a BMI <18.5 or >/=35 were 1.56 (95% confidence interval: 1.07, 2.28) and 3.62 (95% confidence interval: 1.59, 8.22), respectively. A high waist-to-hip ratio was associated with an increased risk of suicide. There was some evidence for a reverse J-shaped association of systolic blood pressure and high density lipoprotein cholesterol with suicide and an association of higher triglyceride level with increased suicide risk; these associations did not appear to mediate the associations of BMI and waist-to-hip ratio with suicide.en_HK
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://aje.oxfordjournals.org/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican Journal of Epidemiologyen_HK
dc.rightsThis is a pre-copy-editing, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in American Journal of Epidemiology following peer review. The definitive publisher-authenticated version American Journal of Epidemiology, 2012, v. 175 n. 8, p. 804-815 is available online at: http://aje.oxfordjournals.org/content/175/8/804-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subject.meshAdiposity-
dc.subject.meshBlood Pressure-
dc.subject.meshBody Mass Index-
dc.subject.meshCholesterol - blood-
dc.subject.meshSuicide - statistics and numerical data-
dc.titleAdiposity, its related biologic risk factors, and suicide: a cohort study of 542,088 Taiwanese adultsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailChang, SS: sschang@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWen, CP: cwengood@nhri.org.tw-
dc.identifier.authorityChang, SS=rp01582en_HK
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/aje/kwr386en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid22427611en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84859710614en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros211095-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84859710614&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume175en_HK
dc.identifier.issue8en_HK
dc.identifier.spage804en_HK
dc.identifier.epage815en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000302806300010-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGunnell, D=55172281100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYang, YC=7409388783en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLawlor, DA=7102452820en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTsai, MK=23971592100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWen, CP=7201366756en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChang, SS=35232386600en_HK

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