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Article: Evaluation of moderate alcohol use and cognitive function among men using a mendelian randomization design in the guangzhou biobank cohort study

TitleEvaluation of moderate alcohol use and cognitive function among men using a mendelian randomization design in the guangzhou biobank cohort study
Authors
Keywordsalcohol drinking
cognition
developing countries
Mendelian randomization analysis
Issue Date2012
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://aje.oxfordjournals.org/
Citation
American Journal Of Epidemiology, 2012, v. 175 n. 10, p. 1021-1028 How to Cite?
AbstractObservational studies usually show that moderate alcohol use is associated with better cognitive function. Such studies are vulnerable to residual confounding arising from systematic differences between moderate alcohol users and others. A Mendelian randomization study carried out in a suitable population, such as southern Chinese men, in which alcohol use is low to moderate and is influenced by genotype, offers an alternative and superior approach for clarifying the causal effect of moderate alcohol use on cognitive function. The authors used aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) genotype (AA, GA, or GG) as an instrumental variable in 2-stage least squares analysis to obtain unbiased estimates of the relation of alcohol consumption (measured in alcohol units (10 g ethanol) per day) with cognitive function, assessed from delayed 10-word recall score (n = 4,707) and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score (n = 2,284), among men from the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study (2003-2008). ALHD2 genotype was strongly associated with alcohol consumption, with an F statistic of 71.0 in 2-stage least squares analysis. Alcohol consumption was not associated with delayed 10-word recall score (-0.03 words per alcohol unit, 95% confidence interval:-0.18, 0.13) or MMSE score (0.06 points per alcohol unit, 95% confidence interval:-0.22, 0.34). Moderate alcohol use is unlikely to be cognitively protective. © The Author 2012. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/148838
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.036
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.047
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Hong Kong Health and Health Services06070981
Health, Welfare and Food Bureau, Government of Hong Kong SAR, People's Republic of China
University of Hong Kong Foundation for Development and Research (Hong Kong, China)
University of Hong Kong University Research Committee (Hong Kong, China)
Guangzhou Public Health Bureau (Guangzhou, China)
Guangzhou Science and Technology Bureau (Guangzhou, China)
University of Birmingham (Birmingham, United Kingdom)
Natural Science Foundation of Guangdong (Guangdong, China)9451062001003477
Funding Information:

This study was supported by the Hong Kong Health and Health Services Research Fund (grant 06070981), Health, Welfare and Food Bureau, Government of Hong Kong SAR, People's Republic of China. The Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study was funded by the University of Hong Kong Foundation for Development and Research (Hong Kong, China), the University of Hong Kong University Research Committee-Strategic Research Theme of Public Health (Hong Kong, China), the Guangzhou Public Health Bureau (Guangzhou, China), the Guangzhou Science and Technology Bureau (Guangzhou, China), the University of Birmingham (Birmingham, United Kingdom), and the Natural Science Foundation of Guangdong (Guangdong, China) (grant 9451062001003477).

References
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DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorAu Yeung, SLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorJiang, CQen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheng, KKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Ben_HK
dc.contributor.authorZhang, WSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSchooling, CMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-12T01:00:24Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-12T01:00:24Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Journal Of Epidemiology, 2012, v. 175 n. 10, p. 1021-1028en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0002-9262en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/148838-
dc.description.abstractObservational studies usually show that moderate alcohol use is associated with better cognitive function. Such studies are vulnerable to residual confounding arising from systematic differences between moderate alcohol users and others. A Mendelian randomization study carried out in a suitable population, such as southern Chinese men, in which alcohol use is low to moderate and is influenced by genotype, offers an alternative and superior approach for clarifying the causal effect of moderate alcohol use on cognitive function. The authors used aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) genotype (AA, GA, or GG) as an instrumental variable in 2-stage least squares analysis to obtain unbiased estimates of the relation of alcohol consumption (measured in alcohol units (10 g ethanol) per day) with cognitive function, assessed from delayed 10-word recall score (n = 4,707) and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score (n = 2,284), among men from the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study (2003-2008). ALHD2 genotype was strongly associated with alcohol consumption, with an F statistic of 71.0 in 2-stage least squares analysis. Alcohol consumption was not associated with delayed 10-word recall score (-0.03 words per alcohol unit, 95% confidence interval:-0.18, 0.13) or MMSE score (0.06 points per alcohol unit, 95% confidence interval:-0.22, 0.34). Moderate alcohol use is unlikely to be cognitively protective. © The Author 2012. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://aje.oxfordjournals.org/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican Journal of Epidemiologyen_HK
dc.rightsThis is a pre-copy-editing, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in American Journal of Epidemiology following peer review. The definitive publisher-authenticated version American Journal Of Epidemiology, 2012, v. 175 n. 10, p. 1021-1028 is available online at: http://aje.oxfordjournals.org/content/175/10/1021-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectalcohol drinkingen_HK
dc.subjectcognitionen_HK
dc.subjectdeveloping countriesen_HK
dc.subjectMendelian randomization analysisen_HK
dc.titleEvaluation of moderate alcohol use and cognitive function among men using a mendelian randomization design in the guangzhou biobank cohort studyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH:hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_HK
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/aje/kwr462en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid22302076-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84861360012en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros199848-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84861360012&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume175en_HK
dc.identifier.issue10en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1021en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1028en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1476-6256-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000304199000007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.relation.projectIs moderate alcohol use causally protective against cardiorespiratory disease?-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAu Yeung, SL=8871840600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJiang, CQ=54383527400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheng, KK=55226379000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiu, B=55226716100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, WS=35180743500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, GM=55157430700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSchooling, CM=55159270400en_HK

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