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Article: Human gastrointestinal neoplasia-associated myofibroblasts can develop from bone marrow-derived cells following allogeneic stem cell transplantation

TitleHuman gastrointestinal neoplasia-associated myofibroblasts can develop from bone marrow-derived cells following allogeneic stem cell transplantation
Authors
Issue Date2009
PublisherAlphaMed Press, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.stemcells.com
Citation
Stem Cells, 2009, v. 27 n. 6, p. 1463-1468 How to Cite?
AbstractThis study characterized the contribution of bone marrow-derived cells to human neoplasia and the perineoplastic stroma. The Australasian Bone Marrow Transplant Recipient Registry was used to identify solid organ neoplasia that developed in female recipients of male allogeneic stem cell transplants. Eighteen suitable cases were identified including several skin cancers, two gastric cancers, and one rectal adenoma. Light microscopy, fluorescence and chromogenic in situ hybridization, and immunohistochemistry were performed to determine the nature and origin of the neoplastic and stromal cells. In contrast to recent reports, donor-derived neoplastic cells were not detected. Bone marrow-derived neoplasia-associated myofibroblasts, however, were identified in the rectal adenoma and in a gastric cancer. Bone marrow-derived cells can generate myofibroblasts in the setting of human gastrointestinal neoplasia. © AlphaMed Press.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/148606
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.902
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.438
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Gastroenterological Society of Australia
Royal Australasian College of Physicians Cottrell Fellowship
Funding Information:

We thank Dr. N. Ambartsumian for reagents. This study was funded in part by a Gastroenterological Society of Australia post-graduate medical scholarship and the Royal Australasian College of Physicians Cottrell Fellowship (to D. L. W.).

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWorthley, DLen_US
dc.contributor.authorRuszkiewicz, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorDavies, Ren_US
dc.contributor.authorMoore, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorNivisonSmith, Ien_US
dc.contributor.authorTo, LBen_US
dc.contributor.authorBrowett, Pen_US
dc.contributor.authorWestern, Ren_US
dc.contributor.authorDurrant, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorSo, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorYoung, GPen_US
dc.contributor.authorMullighan, CGen_US
dc.contributor.authorBardy, PGen_US
dc.contributor.authorMichael, MZen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-29T06:14:04Z-
dc.date.available2012-05-29T06:14:04Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.citationStem Cells, 2009, v. 27 n. 6, p. 1463-1468en_US
dc.identifier.issn1066-5099en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/148606-
dc.description.abstractThis study characterized the contribution of bone marrow-derived cells to human neoplasia and the perineoplastic stroma. The Australasian Bone Marrow Transplant Recipient Registry was used to identify solid organ neoplasia that developed in female recipients of male allogeneic stem cell transplants. Eighteen suitable cases were identified including several skin cancers, two gastric cancers, and one rectal adenoma. Light microscopy, fluorescence and chromogenic in situ hybridization, and immunohistochemistry were performed to determine the nature and origin of the neoplastic and stromal cells. In contrast to recent reports, donor-derived neoplastic cells were not detected. Bone marrow-derived neoplasia-associated myofibroblasts, however, were identified in the rectal adenoma and in a gastric cancer. Bone marrow-derived cells can generate myofibroblasts in the setting of human gastrointestinal neoplasia. © AlphaMed Press.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAlphaMed Press, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.stemcells.comen_US
dc.relation.ispartofStem Cellsen_US
dc.subject.meshBone Marrow Transplantation - Adverse Effectsen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshFibroblasts - Pathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshGastrointestinal Neoplasms - Pathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation - Adverse Effectsen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshImmunohistochemistryen_US
dc.subject.meshIn Situ Hybridization, Fluorescenceen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshNeoplasms, Second Primary - Pathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshStromal Cells - Pathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshTransplantation, Homologousen_US
dc.titleHuman gastrointestinal neoplasia-associated myofibroblasts can develop from bone marrow-derived cells following allogeneic stem cell transplantationen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailSo, J:scc@pathology.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySo, J=rp00391en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/stem.63en_US
dc.identifier.pmid19492298-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-67649592236en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-67649592236&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume27en_US
dc.identifier.issue6en_US
dc.identifier.spage1463en_US
dc.identifier.epage1468en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000267056000024-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US

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