File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Effect of preexercise glycemic-index meal on running when CHO-electrolyte solution is consumed during exercise

TitleEffect of preexercise glycemic-index meal on running when CHO-electrolyte solution is consumed during exercise
Authors
Issue Date2009
PublisherHuman Kinetics. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.humankinetics.com/products/journals/journal.cfm?id=IJSNEM
Citation
International Journal Of Sport Nutrition And Exercise Metabolism, 2009, v. 19 n. 3, p. 222-242 How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose: This study examined the effect of consuming carbohydrate- (CHO) electrolyte solution on running performance after different-glycemic-index (GI) meals. Methods: Nine men completed 3 trials in a randomized counterbalanced order, with trials separated by at least 7 days. Two hours before the run after an overnight fast, each participant consumed a high-GI (GI = 83) or low-GI (GI = 36) CHO meal or low-energy sugar-free Jell-O (GI = 0, control). The 2 isocaloric GI meals provided 1.5 g available CHO/kg body mass. During each trial, 2 ml/kg body mass of a 6.6% CHOelectrolyte solution was provided immediately before exercise and every 2.5 km after the start of running. Each trial consisted of a 21-km performance run on a level treadmill. The participants were required to run at 70% VO2max during the first 5 km of the run. They then completed the remaining 16 km as fast as possible. Results: There was no difference in the time to complete the 21-km run (high-GI vs. low-GI vs. control: 91.1 ± 2.0 vs. 91.8 ± 2.2 vs. 92.9 ± 2.0 min, n.s.). There were no differences in total CHO and fat oxidation throughout the trials, despite differences in preexercise blood glucose, serum insulin, and serum free-fatty-acid concentrations. Conclusion: When a CHO-electrolyte solution is consumed during a 21-km run, the GI of the preexercise CHO meal makes no difference in running performance. © 2009 Human Kinetics, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/148600
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.105
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.036
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, SHSen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, OWen_US
dc.contributor.authorChen, YJen_US
dc.contributor.authorHu, HLen_US
dc.contributor.authorLam, CWen_US
dc.contributor.authorChung, PKen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-29T06:14:00Z-
dc.date.available2012-05-29T06:14:00Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Sport Nutrition And Exercise Metabolism, 2009, v. 19 n. 3, p. 222-242en_US
dc.identifier.issn1526-484Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/148600-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: This study examined the effect of consuming carbohydrate- (CHO) electrolyte solution on running performance after different-glycemic-index (GI) meals. Methods: Nine men completed 3 trials in a randomized counterbalanced order, with trials separated by at least 7 days. Two hours before the run after an overnight fast, each participant consumed a high-GI (GI = 83) or low-GI (GI = 36) CHO meal or low-energy sugar-free Jell-O (GI = 0, control). The 2 isocaloric GI meals provided 1.5 g available CHO/kg body mass. During each trial, 2 ml/kg body mass of a 6.6% CHOelectrolyte solution was provided immediately before exercise and every 2.5 km after the start of running. Each trial consisted of a 21-km performance run on a level treadmill. The participants were required to run at 70% VO2max during the first 5 km of the run. They then completed the remaining 16 km as fast as possible. Results: There was no difference in the time to complete the 21-km run (high-GI vs. low-GI vs. control: 91.1 ± 2.0 vs. 91.8 ± 2.2 vs. 92.9 ± 2.0 min, n.s.). There were no differences in total CHO and fat oxidation throughout the trials, despite differences in preexercise blood glucose, serum insulin, and serum free-fatty-acid concentrations. Conclusion: When a CHO-electrolyte solution is consumed during a 21-km run, the GI of the preexercise CHO meal makes no difference in running performance. © 2009 Human Kinetics, Inc.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherHuman Kinetics. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.humankinetics.com/products/journals/journal.cfm?id=IJSNEMen_US
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshArea Under Curveen_US
dc.subject.meshBlood Glucose - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshCross-Over Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshDietary Carbohydrates - Administration & Dosage - Classification - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshElectrolytes - Administration & Dosage - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshGlycemic Indexen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshInsulin - Blooden_US
dc.subject.meshLactic Acid - Blooden_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshOxidation-Reductionen_US
dc.subject.meshOxygen Consumptionen_US
dc.subject.meshPhysical Endurance - Drug Effects - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshRunning - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshYoung Adulten_US
dc.titleEffect of preexercise glycemic-index meal on running when CHO-electrolyte solution is consumed during exerciseen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLam, CW:ching-wanlam@pathology.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLam, CW=rp00260en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid19574611-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-66849104288en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-66849104288&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume19en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage222en_US
dc.identifier.epage242en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000267326600002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats