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Article: Effect of the glycaemic index of pre-exercise carbohydrate meals on running performance

TitleEffect of the glycaemic index of pre-exercise carbohydrate meals on running performance
Authors
KeywordsFree Fatty Acids
Glucose
Glycaemic Index
Insulin
Male Runners
Treadmill Running
Issue Date2008
PublisherTaylor & Francis Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/17461391.asp
Citation
European Journal Of Sport Science, 2008, v. 8 n. 1, p. 23-33 How to Cite?
AbstractThe aim of this study was to examine the effect of pre-exercise low and high glycaemic index (GI) carbohydrate meals on running performance. Eight endurance-trained male runners (mean age 33 years, sx = 1.7; VO2max 63 ml · kg-1 · min-1, sx = 1.8) completed two trials separated by at least 7 days in a counterbalanced design. Two hours before they were to run and after an overnight fast, each participant consumed an isocaloric meal containing either low (gi=37) or high (gi=77) GI carbohydrate foods (2.4 MJ; 65% carbohydrate; 15% protein; 20% fat) that provided 1.5 g carbohydrate per kilogram of body mass in random order. Each trial consisted of a 21-km performance run on a level treadmill. The participants were required to run at 70% VO2max during the first 5 km of the run. They subsequently completed the remaining 16 km in as short a time as possible. All participants achieved a faster performance time after the consumption of the low GI meal (low vs. high GI: 98.7 min, sx=2 vs. 101.5 min, sx = 2; P <0.01). Blood glucose and serum free fatty acids concentrations were higher throughout the performance run in the low GI trial. Serum insulin concentrations were higher in the high GI trial during the postpandial resting period. However, there were no differences between trials in serum insulin or blood lactate concentrations throughout exercise. Compared with the high GI trial, carbohydrate oxidation was 9.5% lower and fat oxidation was 17.9% higher during exercise in the low GI trial. In conclusion, our results indicate that compared with an isocaloric high GI meal, the consumption of a low GI meal 2 h before a 21-km performance run is a more effective means of improving performance time.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/148546
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.785
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.714
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, SHSen_US
dc.contributor.authorSiu, PMen_US
dc.contributor.authorLok, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorChen, YJen_US
dc.contributor.authorMorris, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorLam, CWen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-29T06:13:38Z-
dc.date.available2012-05-29T06:13:38Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.identifier.citationEuropean Journal Of Sport Science, 2008, v. 8 n. 1, p. 23-33en_US
dc.identifier.issn1746-1391en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/148546-
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this study was to examine the effect of pre-exercise low and high glycaemic index (GI) carbohydrate meals on running performance. Eight endurance-trained male runners (mean age 33 years, sx = 1.7; VO2max 63 ml · kg-1 · min-1, sx = 1.8) completed two trials separated by at least 7 days in a counterbalanced design. Two hours before they were to run and after an overnight fast, each participant consumed an isocaloric meal containing either low (gi=37) or high (gi=77) GI carbohydrate foods (2.4 MJ; 65% carbohydrate; 15% protein; 20% fat) that provided 1.5 g carbohydrate per kilogram of body mass in random order. Each trial consisted of a 21-km performance run on a level treadmill. The participants were required to run at 70% VO2max during the first 5 km of the run. They subsequently completed the remaining 16 km in as short a time as possible. All participants achieved a faster performance time after the consumption of the low GI meal (low vs. high GI: 98.7 min, sx=2 vs. 101.5 min, sx = 2; P <0.01). Blood glucose and serum free fatty acids concentrations were higher throughout the performance run in the low GI trial. Serum insulin concentrations were higher in the high GI trial during the postpandial resting period. However, there were no differences between trials in serum insulin or blood lactate concentrations throughout exercise. Compared with the high GI trial, carbohydrate oxidation was 9.5% lower and fat oxidation was 17.9% higher during exercise in the low GI trial. In conclusion, our results indicate that compared with an isocaloric high GI meal, the consumption of a low GI meal 2 h before a 21-km performance run is a more effective means of improving performance time.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/17461391.aspen_US
dc.relation.ispartofEuropean Journal of Sport Scienceen_US
dc.subjectFree Fatty Acidsen_US
dc.subjectGlucoseen_US
dc.subjectGlycaemic Indexen_US
dc.subjectInsulinen_US
dc.subjectMale Runnersen_US
dc.subjectTreadmill Runningen_US
dc.titleEffect of the glycaemic index of pre-exercise carbohydrate meals on running performanceen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLam, CW:ching-wanlam@pathology.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLam, CW=rp00260en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/17461390701819451en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-39049124333en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-39049124333&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume8en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage23en_US
dc.identifier.epage33en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000252932600004-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US

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