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Article: The familial risk and HLA susceptibility among narcolepsy patients in Hong Kong Chinese

TitleThe familial risk and HLA susceptibility among narcolepsy patients in Hong Kong Chinese
Authors
Issue Date2007
PublisherThe American Academy of Sleep Medicine. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.journalsleep.org
Citation
Sleep, 2007, v. 30 n. 7, p. 851-858 How to Cite?
AbstractStudy Objectives: To explore the familial aggregation and HLA susceptibility of narcolepsy in Hong Kong Chinese by objective sleep measurements and HLA typing. Design: Case control design Participants: Twelve narcoleptic probands, 34 first-degree relatives, and 30 healthy controls. Interventions: N/A Measurements and Results: Each subject underwent a standardized nocturnal polysomnogram (PSG), followed by a daytime multiple sleep latency test (MSLT). HLA typing was performed for all subjects. One relative (2.9%) was diagnosed as suffering from narcolepsy with cataplexy. Nearly 30% of the relatives fulfilled the criteria of narcolepsy spectrum disorder (shortened mean sleep latency [MSL] and/or the presence of sleep onset REM periods [SOREMPs]). When using the population data for comparison, the relative risk of narcolepsy in first-degree relatives was 85.3. The odds ratio of narcolepsy spectrum disorder in first-degree relatives was 5.8 (95% CI: 1.2-29.3) when compared to healthy controls. There existed 6 multiplex families, in which all 10 relatives with narcolepsy spectrum disorders, including all 3 relatives with multiple SOREMPs, were positive for HLA DQB1*0602. Conclusions: Our study demonstrated a definitive familial aggregation of narcolepsy, narcolepsy spectrum disorders, and possibly cataplexy in Hong Kong Chinese. This familial aggregation supported an inherited basis for narcolepsy spectrum. The tight co-segregation of HLA DQB1*0602 and narcolepsy spectrum disorders might suggest that HLA typing, especially DQB1*0602, at least partly confer the familial risk of narcolepsy. In addition, our study suggested that the subjective questionnaire measurements including Ullanlinna Narcolepsy Scale and Epworth Sleepiness Scale were unable to detect the presence of narcolepsy spectrum disorders among the relatives. Astringent objective measurement-based design for family studies is suggested for future study. Further studies are indicated for the determination of the mode and molecular level of narcolepsy transmission.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/148516
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.793
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.606
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChen, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorFong, SYYen_US
dc.contributor.authorLam, CWen_US
dc.contributor.authorTang, NLSen_US
dc.contributor.authorNg, MHLen_US
dc.contributor.authorLi, AMen_US
dc.contributor.authorHo, CKWen_US
dc.contributor.authorCheng, SHen_US
dc.contributor.authorLau, KMen_US
dc.contributor.authorWing, YKen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-29T06:13:26Z-
dc.date.available2012-05-29T06:13:26Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.identifier.citationSleep, 2007, v. 30 n. 7, p. 851-858en_US
dc.identifier.issn0161-8105en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/148516-
dc.description.abstractStudy Objectives: To explore the familial aggregation and HLA susceptibility of narcolepsy in Hong Kong Chinese by objective sleep measurements and HLA typing. Design: Case control design Participants: Twelve narcoleptic probands, 34 first-degree relatives, and 30 healthy controls. Interventions: N/A Measurements and Results: Each subject underwent a standardized nocturnal polysomnogram (PSG), followed by a daytime multiple sleep latency test (MSLT). HLA typing was performed for all subjects. One relative (2.9%) was diagnosed as suffering from narcolepsy with cataplexy. Nearly 30% of the relatives fulfilled the criteria of narcolepsy spectrum disorder (shortened mean sleep latency [MSL] and/or the presence of sleep onset REM periods [SOREMPs]). When using the population data for comparison, the relative risk of narcolepsy in first-degree relatives was 85.3. The odds ratio of narcolepsy spectrum disorder in first-degree relatives was 5.8 (95% CI: 1.2-29.3) when compared to healthy controls. There existed 6 multiplex families, in which all 10 relatives with narcolepsy spectrum disorders, including all 3 relatives with multiple SOREMPs, were positive for HLA DQB1*0602. Conclusions: Our study demonstrated a definitive familial aggregation of narcolepsy, narcolepsy spectrum disorders, and possibly cataplexy in Hong Kong Chinese. This familial aggregation supported an inherited basis for narcolepsy spectrum. The tight co-segregation of HLA DQB1*0602 and narcolepsy spectrum disorders might suggest that HLA typing, especially DQB1*0602, at least partly confer the familial risk of narcolepsy. In addition, our study suggested that the subjective questionnaire measurements including Ullanlinna Narcolepsy Scale and Epworth Sleepiness Scale were unable to detect the presence of narcolepsy spectrum disorders among the relatives. Astringent objective measurement-based design for family studies is suggested for future study. Further studies are indicated for the determination of the mode and molecular level of narcolepsy transmission.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherThe American Academy of Sleep Medicine. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.journalsleep.orgen_US
dc.relation.ispartofSleepen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAsian Continental Ancestry Group - Ethnologyen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshGenetic Predisposition To Diseaseen_US
dc.subject.meshHla Antigens - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshHong Kongen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshNarcolepsy - Ethnology - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshPedigreeen_US
dc.subject.meshPolysomnographyen_US
dc.subject.meshPopulation Surveillanceen_US
dc.subject.meshPrevalenceen_US
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshSleep Stages - Physiologyen_US
dc.titleThe familial risk and HLA susceptibility among narcolepsy patients in Hong Kong Chineseen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLam, CW:ching-wanlam@pathology.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLam, CW=rp00260en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid17682655-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-34447279443en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-34447279443&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume30en_US
dc.identifier.issue7en_US
dc.identifier.spage851en_US
dc.identifier.epage858en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000247709800007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US

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