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Article: Worldwide genomic diversity of the high-risk human papillomavirus types 31, 35, 52, and 58, four close relatives of human papillomavirus type 16

TitleWorldwide genomic diversity of the high-risk human papillomavirus types 31, 35, 52, and 58, four close relatives of human papillomavirus type 16
Authors
Issue Date2005
PublisherAmerican Society for Microbiology. The Journal's web site is located at http://jvi.asm.org/
Citation
Journal Of Virology, 2005, v. 79 n. 21, p. 13630-13640 How to Cite?
AbstractAmong the more than one hundred formally described human papillomavirus (HPV) types, 18 are referred to as high-risk HPV types due to their association with anogenital cancer. Despite pathogenic similarities, these types form three remotely related taxonomic groups. One of these groups is called HPV species 9 and is formed by HPV-16, the most common and best-studied type, together with HPV-31, -33, -35, -52, -58, and -67. Previous worldwide comparisons of HPV-16 samples showed about 2% nucleotide diversity between isolates, which were subsequently termed variants. The distribution of divergent variants has been found to correlate frequently with the geographic origin and the ethnicity of the infected patients and led to the concept of unique African, European, Asian, and Native American HPV-16 variants. In the current study, we address the question of whether geography and ethnicity also correlate with sequence variations found for IIPV-31, -35, -52, and -58. This was done by sequencing the long control region in samples derived from Europe, Asia, and Africa, and from immigrant populations in North and South America. We observed maximal divergence between any two variants within each of these four HPV types ranging from 1.8 to 3.6% based on nucleotide exchanges and, occasionally, on insertions and deletions. Similar to the case with HPV-16, these mutations are not random but indicate a relationship between the variants in form of phylogenetic trees. An interesting example is presented by a 16-bp insert in select variants of HPV-35, which appears to have given rise to additional variants by nucleotide exchanges within the insert. All trees showed distinct phylogenetic topologies, ranging from dichotomic branching in the case of HPV-31 to star phytogenies of the other three types. No clear similarities between these types or between these types and HPV-16 exist. While variant branches in some types were specific for Europe, Africa, or East Asia, none of the four trees reflected human evolution and spread to the extent illustrated by HPV-16. One possible explanation is that the rare HPV types that we studied spread and thereby diversified more slowly than the more abundant HPV-16 and may have established much of today's variant diversity already before the worldwide spread of humans 100,000 years ago. Most variants had prototypic amino acid sequences within the E6 oncoprotein and a segment of the L1 capsid protein. Some had one, two, or three amino acid substitutions in these regions, which might indicate biological and pathogenic diversity between the variants of each HPV type. Copyright © 2005, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/148430
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.606
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.347
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCallejaMacias, IEen_HK
dc.contributor.authorVilla, LLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPrado, JCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKalantari, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorAllan, Ben_HK
dc.contributor.authorWilliamson, ALen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChung, LPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCollins, RJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorZuna, REen_HK
dc.contributor.authorDunn, STen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChu, TYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCubie, HAen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCuschieri, Ken_HK
dc.contributor.authorVon KnebelDoeberitz, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorMartins, CRen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSanchez, GIen_HK
dc.contributor.authorBosch, FXen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMunoz, Nen_HK
dc.contributor.authorBernard, HUen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-29T06:12:56Z-
dc.date.available2012-05-29T06:12:56Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Virology, 2005, v. 79 n. 21, p. 13630-13640en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0022-538Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/148430-
dc.description.abstractAmong the more than one hundred formally described human papillomavirus (HPV) types, 18 are referred to as high-risk HPV types due to their association with anogenital cancer. Despite pathogenic similarities, these types form three remotely related taxonomic groups. One of these groups is called HPV species 9 and is formed by HPV-16, the most common and best-studied type, together with HPV-31, -33, -35, -52, -58, and -67. Previous worldwide comparisons of HPV-16 samples showed about 2% nucleotide diversity between isolates, which were subsequently termed variants. The distribution of divergent variants has been found to correlate frequently with the geographic origin and the ethnicity of the infected patients and led to the concept of unique African, European, Asian, and Native American HPV-16 variants. In the current study, we address the question of whether geography and ethnicity also correlate with sequence variations found for IIPV-31, -35, -52, and -58. This was done by sequencing the long control region in samples derived from Europe, Asia, and Africa, and from immigrant populations in North and South America. We observed maximal divergence between any two variants within each of these four HPV types ranging from 1.8 to 3.6% based on nucleotide exchanges and, occasionally, on insertions and deletions. Similar to the case with HPV-16, these mutations are not random but indicate a relationship between the variants in form of phylogenetic trees. An interesting example is presented by a 16-bp insert in select variants of HPV-35, which appears to have given rise to additional variants by nucleotide exchanges within the insert. All trees showed distinct phylogenetic topologies, ranging from dichotomic branching in the case of HPV-31 to star phytogenies of the other three types. No clear similarities between these types or between these types and HPV-16 exist. While variant branches in some types were specific for Europe, Africa, or East Asia, none of the four trees reflected human evolution and spread to the extent illustrated by HPV-16. One possible explanation is that the rare HPV types that we studied spread and thereby diversified more slowly than the more abundant HPV-16 and may have established much of today's variant diversity already before the worldwide spread of humans 100,000 years ago. Most variants had prototypic amino acid sequences within the E6 oncoprotein and a segment of the L1 capsid protein. Some had one, two, or three amino acid substitutions in these regions, which might indicate biological and pathogenic diversity between the variants of each HPV type. Copyright © 2005, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Society for Microbiology. The Journal's web site is located at http://jvi.asm.org/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Virologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshAfricaen_US
dc.subject.meshAmericasen_US
dc.subject.meshAsiaen_US
dc.subject.meshEuropeen_US
dc.subject.meshGenes, Viralen_US
dc.subject.meshGenetic Variationen_US
dc.subject.meshMolecular Sequence Dataen_US
dc.subject.meshPapillomaviridae - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshPapillomavirus Infections - Virologyen_US
dc.subject.meshPhylogenyen_US
dc.titleWorldwide genomic diversity of the high-risk human papillomavirus types 31, 35, 52, and 58, four close relatives of human papillomavirus type 16en_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailChung, LP: lpchung@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailCollins, RJ: rcollins@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChung, LP=rp00249en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCollins, RJ=rp00251en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1128/JVI.79.21.13630-13640.2005en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid16227283-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-27144450871en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-27144450871&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume79en_HK
dc.identifier.issue21en_HK
dc.identifier.spage13630en_HK
dc.identifier.epage13640en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000232666300041-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCallejaMacias, IE=6507782063en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridVilla, LL=7102824355en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPrado, JC=8886982700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKalantari, M=6701552986en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAllan, B=7102506110en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWilliamson, AL=8363457500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChung, LP=24315879100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCollins, RJ=7403350455en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZuna, RE=6701422748en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDunn, ST=7201627243en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChu, TY=7401775698en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCubie, HA=7003598660en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCuschieri, K=6506948763en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridVon KnebelDoeberitz, M=35477888400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMartins, CR=35598785800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSanchez, GI=7202034893en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBosch, FX=7201833375en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMunoz, N=7102360543en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBernard, HU=7103326376en_HK

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