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Article: Epigenetic memory of active gene transcription is inherited through somatic cell nuclear transfer

TitleEpigenetic memory of active gene transcription is inherited through somatic cell nuclear transfer
Authors
Issue Date2005
PublisherNational Academy of Sciences. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.pnas.org
Citation
Proceedings Of The National Academy Of Sciences Of The United States Of America, 2005, v. 102 n. 6, p. 1957-1962 How to Cite?
AbstractThe transplantation of somatic cell nuclei to enucleated eggs has shown that genes can be reprogrammed to an embryonic pattern of expression, thereby indicating a reversal of their epigenetic state. However, in Xenopus nuclear transfer experiments using both endoderm and neuroectoderm donor cells, we have observed substantial overexpression of donor cell type-specific genes, both spatially and temporally, in the wrong cell type in some nuclear transplant embryos. For example, more than half of the embryos prepared from transplanted neuroectoderm nuclei overexpressed the neuroectodermal marker gene Sox2 to an excessive level in their endoderm cells. Because, in Xenopus, there is no transcription for the first 12 cell cycles, some somatic cell nuclei must remember a developmentally activated gene state and transmit this to their mitotic progeny in the absence of the conditions that induced that state. We also find that donor cell-specific genes are transcribed at an earlier stage than normal in an inappropriate cell type. This phenomenon of epigenetic memory applies to genes that are transcribed in donor nuclei; it does not influence those genes that are competent to be transcribed in nuclear transplant embryo tissue, but were not actually transcribed in donor nuclei at the time of nuclear transfer. We conclude that an epigenetic memory is established in differentiating somatic cells and applies to genes that are in a transcriptionally active state.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/148391
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 9.423
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 6.883
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorNg, RKen_US
dc.contributor.authorGurdon, JBen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-29T06:12:41Z-
dc.date.available2012-05-29T06:12:41Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.identifier.citationProceedings Of The National Academy Of Sciences Of The United States Of America, 2005, v. 102 n. 6, p. 1957-1962en_US
dc.identifier.issn0027-8424en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/148391-
dc.description.abstractThe transplantation of somatic cell nuclei to enucleated eggs has shown that genes can be reprogrammed to an embryonic pattern of expression, thereby indicating a reversal of their epigenetic state. However, in Xenopus nuclear transfer experiments using both endoderm and neuroectoderm donor cells, we have observed substantial overexpression of donor cell type-specific genes, both spatially and temporally, in the wrong cell type in some nuclear transplant embryos. For example, more than half of the embryos prepared from transplanted neuroectoderm nuclei overexpressed the neuroectodermal marker gene Sox2 to an excessive level in their endoderm cells. Because, in Xenopus, there is no transcription for the first 12 cell cycles, some somatic cell nuclei must remember a developmentally activated gene state and transmit this to their mitotic progeny in the absence of the conditions that induced that state. We also find that donor cell-specific genes are transcribed at an earlier stage than normal in an inappropriate cell type. This phenomenon of epigenetic memory applies to genes that are transcribed in donor nuclei; it does not influence those genes that are competent to be transcribed in nuclear transplant embryo tissue, but were not actually transcribed in donor nuclei at the time of nuclear transfer. We conclude that an epigenetic memory is established in differentiating somatic cells and applies to genes that are in a transcriptionally active state.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherNational Academy of Sciences. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.pnas.orgen_US
dc.relation.ispartofProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of Americaen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshBiological Markersen_US
dc.subject.meshCell Nucleus - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshDna-Binding Proteins - Genetics - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshEpigenesis, Geneticen_US
dc.subject.meshGene Expression Regulation, Developmentalen_US
dc.subject.meshHmgb Proteinsen_US
dc.subject.meshNuclear Proteins - Genetics - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshNuclear Transfer Techniquesen_US
dc.subject.meshSoxb1 Transcription Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshTranscription Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshTranscription, Geneticen_US
dc.subject.meshXenopus Proteins - Genetics - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshXenopus Laevis - Anatomy & Histology - Embryology - Genetics - Metabolismen_US
dc.titleEpigenetic memory of active gene transcription is inherited through somatic cell nuclear transferen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailNg, RK:rayng@pathology.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityNg, RK=rp00273en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1073/pnas.0409813102en_US
dc.identifier.pmid15684086-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-13844311008en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-13844311008&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume102en_US
dc.identifier.issue6en_US
dc.identifier.spage1957en_US
dc.identifier.epage1962en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000227072900030-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.f10001023829-
dc.identifier.citeulike177004-

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