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Article: SARS: Clinical virology and pathogenesis

TitleSARS: Clinical virology and pathogenesis
Authors
KeywordsHistology
Pathology
SARS coronavirus
Severe acute respiratory syndrome
Issue Date2003
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Asia. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/RES
Citation
Respirology, 2003, v. 8, p. S6-S8 How to Cite?
AbstractSevere acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is caused by a novel coronavirus, called the SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV). Over 95% of well characterized cohorts of SARS have evidence of recent SARS-CoV infection. The genome of SARS-CoV has been sequenced and it is not related to any of the previously known human or animal coronaviruses. It is probable that SARS-CoV was an animal virus that adapted to human-human transmission in the recent past. The virus can be found in nasopharyngeal aspirate, urine and stools of SARS patients. Second generation reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assays are able to detect SARS-CoV in nasopharyngeal aspirates of approximately 80% of patients with SARS within the first 3 days of illness. Seroconversion for SARS-CoV using immunofluorescence on infected cells is an excellent method of confirming the diagnosis, but antibody responses only appear around day 10 of the illness. Within the first 10 days the histological picture is that of acute phase diffuse alveolar damage (DAD) with a mixture of inflammatory infiltrate, oedema and hyaline membrane formation. Desquamation of pneumocytes is prominent and consistent. After 10 days of illness the picture changes to one of organizing DAD with increased fibrosis, squamous metaplasia and multinucleated giant cells. The role of cytokines in the pathogenesis of SARS is still unclear.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/148366
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.078
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.157
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorNicholls, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorDong, XPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorJiang, Gen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPeiris, Men_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-29T06:12:30Z-
dc.date.available2012-05-29T06:12:30Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_HK
dc.identifier.citationRespirology, 2003, v. 8, p. S6-S8en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1323-7799en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/148366-
dc.description.abstractSevere acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is caused by a novel coronavirus, called the SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV). Over 95% of well characterized cohorts of SARS have evidence of recent SARS-CoV infection. The genome of SARS-CoV has been sequenced and it is not related to any of the previously known human or animal coronaviruses. It is probable that SARS-CoV was an animal virus that adapted to human-human transmission in the recent past. The virus can be found in nasopharyngeal aspirate, urine and stools of SARS patients. Second generation reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assays are able to detect SARS-CoV in nasopharyngeal aspirates of approximately 80% of patients with SARS within the first 3 days of illness. Seroconversion for SARS-CoV using immunofluorescence on infected cells is an excellent method of confirming the diagnosis, but antibody responses only appear around day 10 of the illness. Within the first 10 days the histological picture is that of acute phase diffuse alveolar damage (DAD) with a mixture of inflammatory infiltrate, oedema and hyaline membrane formation. Desquamation of pneumocytes is prominent and consistent. After 10 days of illness the picture changes to one of organizing DAD with increased fibrosis, squamous metaplasia and multinucleated giant cells. The role of cytokines in the pathogenesis of SARS is still unclear.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Asia. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/RESen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofRespirologyen_HK
dc.subjectHistologyen_HK
dc.subjectPathologyen_HK
dc.subjectSARS coronavirusen_HK
dc.subjectSevere acute respiratory syndromeen_HK
dc.subject.meshHistological Techniquesen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshSars Virus - Isolation & Purification - Pathogenicityen_US
dc.subject.meshSevere Acute Respiratory Syndrome - Pathology - Virologyen_US
dc.titleSARS: Clinical virology and pathogenesisen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailNicholls, J: jmnichol@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailPeiris, M: malik@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityNicholls, J=rp00364en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityPeiris, M=rp00410en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1046/j.1440-1843.2003.00517.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid15018126-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0345732171en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0345732171&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume8en_HK
dc.identifier.spageS6en_HK
dc.identifier.epageS8en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000187345100003-
dc.publisher.placeAustraliaen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNicholls, J=7201463077en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDong, XP=24605193200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJiang, G=7401706466en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPeiris, M=7005486823en_HK

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