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Article: Prevalence and specificity of clinically significant red cell alloantibodies in Chinese women during pregnancy - A review of cases from 1997 to 2001

TitlePrevalence and specificity of clinically significant red cell alloantibodies in Chinese women during pregnancy - A review of cases from 1997 to 2001
Authors
KeywordsHaemolytic disease of the newborn
Pregnancy
Prevalence
Red cell antibodies
Issue Date2003
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/TME
Citation
Transfusion Medicine, 2003, v. 13 n. 4, p. 227-231 How to Cite?
AbstractGuidelines for the prevention and management of red cell alloantibodies during pregnancy, related to anti-D in particular, are well established in Caucasian populations. However, because of the racial difference of the blood group distribution, applicability to Chinese is unknown as a result of insufficient data on the prevalence and their outcome. In a retrospective review of 28 303 (21327 Chinese) antenatal attendances from 1997 to 2001, 213 (0.79%) women were found to have a total of 230 irregular antibodies. About 137 (0.64%) were ethnic Chinese, and a total of 160 irregular antibodies were identified in their blood samples. About 58 of these Chinese women (0.27%) were found to have 66 clinically significant antibodies. There was only one case of anti-D detected in an Rh(D)-negative subject. Our study shows the overall prevalence of clinically significant antibodies in Chinese women, which was not different from that of the Western population. However, the specificities of the antibodies differ with the commonest antibodies encountered; these being anti-Mi (57.6%), anti-E (19.7%), anti-S (10.6%) and anti-c (7.6%). Neonatal jaundice was observed in 37 babies and 10 of them required phototherapy. The findings support the previous recommendation that routine antenatal antibody screening for Chinese women may not be worthwhile except in Rh(D)-negative subjects or those with an antecedent history of haemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN). The relative high incidence of anti-Mi in the present study and the local population, in general, may warrant a large-scale prospective study of pregnancy outcome in these subjects, especially in the light of the previous case reports of HDN because of anti-Mi.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/148354
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.689
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.528
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLee, CKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMa, ESKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTang, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, CCKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLin, CKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, LCen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-29T06:12:26Z-
dc.date.available2012-05-29T06:12:26Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_HK
dc.identifier.citationTransfusion Medicine, 2003, v. 13 n. 4, p. 227-231en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0958-7578en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/148354-
dc.description.abstractGuidelines for the prevention and management of red cell alloantibodies during pregnancy, related to anti-D in particular, are well established in Caucasian populations. However, because of the racial difference of the blood group distribution, applicability to Chinese is unknown as a result of insufficient data on the prevalence and their outcome. In a retrospective review of 28 303 (21327 Chinese) antenatal attendances from 1997 to 2001, 213 (0.79%) women were found to have a total of 230 irregular antibodies. About 137 (0.64%) were ethnic Chinese, and a total of 160 irregular antibodies were identified in their blood samples. About 58 of these Chinese women (0.27%) were found to have 66 clinically significant antibodies. There was only one case of anti-D detected in an Rh(D)-negative subject. Our study shows the overall prevalence of clinically significant antibodies in Chinese women, which was not different from that of the Western population. However, the specificities of the antibodies differ with the commonest antibodies encountered; these being anti-Mi (57.6%), anti-E (19.7%), anti-S (10.6%) and anti-c (7.6%). Neonatal jaundice was observed in 37 babies and 10 of them required phototherapy. The findings support the previous recommendation that routine antenatal antibody screening for Chinese women may not be worthwhile except in Rh(D)-negative subjects or those with an antecedent history of haemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN). The relative high incidence of anti-Mi in the present study and the local population, in general, may warrant a large-scale prospective study of pregnancy outcome in these subjects, especially in the light of the previous case reports of HDN because of anti-Mi.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/TMEen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofTransfusion Medicineen_HK
dc.subjectHaemolytic disease of the newbornen_HK
dc.subjectPregnancyen_HK
dc.subjectPrevalenceen_HK
dc.subjectRed cell antibodiesen_HK
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAntibody Specificityen_US
dc.subject.meshAsian Continental Ancestry Group - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshBlood Group Antigens - Genetics - Immunologyen_US
dc.subject.meshBlood Grouping And Crossmatchingen_US
dc.subject.meshChina - Ethnologyen_US
dc.subject.meshErythrocytes - Immunologyen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHong Kongen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshIsoantibodies - Genetics - Immunologyen_US
dc.subject.meshMaternal Health Services - Statistics & Numerical Dataen_US
dc.subject.meshPregnancy - Immunologyen_US
dc.subject.meshPrevalenceen_US
dc.subject.meshRetrospective Studiesen_US
dc.titlePrevalence and specificity of clinically significant red cell alloantibodies in Chinese women during pregnancy - A review of cases from 1997 to 2001en_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailTang, M: mhytang@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChan, LC: chanlc@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityTang, M=rp01701en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChan, LC=rp00373en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1046/j.1365-3148.2003.00445.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid12880393-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0043198547en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0043198547&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume13en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage227en_HK
dc.identifier.epage231en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000184383100006-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, CK=36087620900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMa, ESK=7202039934en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTang, M=8943401300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, CCK=16947291300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLin, CK=15034856400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, LC=7403540707en_HK

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