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Article: Evaluation of a new handheld biosensor for point-of-care testing of whole blood beta-hydroxybutyrate concentration.

TitleEvaluation of a new handheld biosensor for point-of-care testing of whole blood beta-hydroxybutyrate concentration.
Authors
Issue Date2002
PublisherHong Kong Medical Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkmj.org/resources/supp.html
Citation
Hong Kong Medical Journal = Xianggang Yi Xue Za Zhi / Hong Kong Academy Of Medicine, 2002, v. 8 n. 3, p. 172-176 How to Cite?
AbstractOBJECTIVES: To evaluate performance characteristics of the newly available handheld combined glucose and ketone meter for beta-hydroxybutyrate measurement. DESIGN. Laboratory method evaluation. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES. Accuracy of beta-hydroxybutyrate measurement and effect of acetoacetate interference at clinically important beta-hydroxybutyrate levels. RESULTS. Deming regression analysis of beta-hydroxybutyrate measurements assessed by the ketone sensor and a laboratory enzymatic method revealed a coefficient of determination of 0.989 (P<0.001). Passing-Bablok regression analysis showed a linear relationship between the two methods, ie Y= -0.32+1.13X. The 95% confidence interval of the slope and y-intercept were: slope=1.13 (95% confidence interval, 1.04 to 1.22); intercept= -0.32 (95% confidence interval, -0.59 to -0.06). The Bland-Altman plot showed a small proportional bias between the two methods. The mean bias +/-2 standard deviations was between -0.53 and 0.67 mmol/L. Beta-hydroxybutyrate measurements made by the sensor were linear up to 6 mmol/L. Replicate analysis of two samples spiked with 3.6 mmol/L and 0.8 mmol/L of beta-hydroxybutyrate resulted in coefficients of variation of 3.3% and 13%, respectively. The presence of acetoacetate caused a negative interference in beta-hydroxybutyrate measurement. Beta-hydroxybutyrate recovery was 97.0% and 90.7% when the ketone body ratios were 6:1 and 3:1, respectively. CONCLUSION. The analytical performance of the sensor, when operated according to manufacturer's instructions, could meet the needs of point-of-care beta-hydroxybutyrate measurement. Additional clinical studies are needed to assess the benefits of introducing such an assay in a clinical setting.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/148289
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.887
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.279

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChiu, RWen_US
dc.contributor.authorHo, CSen_US
dc.contributor.authorTong, SFen_US
dc.contributor.authorNg, KFen_US
dc.contributor.authorLam, CWen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-29T06:12:01Z-
dc.date.available2012-05-29T06:12:01Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.identifier.citationHong Kong Medical Journal = Xianggang Yi Xue Za Zhi / Hong Kong Academy Of Medicine, 2002, v. 8 n. 3, p. 172-176en_US
dc.identifier.issn1024-2708en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/148289-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: To evaluate performance characteristics of the newly available handheld combined glucose and ketone meter for beta-hydroxybutyrate measurement. DESIGN. Laboratory method evaluation. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES. Accuracy of beta-hydroxybutyrate measurement and effect of acetoacetate interference at clinically important beta-hydroxybutyrate levels. RESULTS. Deming regression analysis of beta-hydroxybutyrate measurements assessed by the ketone sensor and a laboratory enzymatic method revealed a coefficient of determination of 0.989 (P<0.001). Passing-Bablok regression analysis showed a linear relationship between the two methods, ie Y= -0.32+1.13X. The 95% confidence interval of the slope and y-intercept were: slope=1.13 (95% confidence interval, 1.04 to 1.22); intercept= -0.32 (95% confidence interval, -0.59 to -0.06). The Bland-Altman plot showed a small proportional bias between the two methods. The mean bias +/-2 standard deviations was between -0.53 and 0.67 mmol/L. Beta-hydroxybutyrate measurements made by the sensor were linear up to 6 mmol/L. Replicate analysis of two samples spiked with 3.6 mmol/L and 0.8 mmol/L of beta-hydroxybutyrate resulted in coefficients of variation of 3.3% and 13%, respectively. The presence of acetoacetate caused a negative interference in beta-hydroxybutyrate measurement. Beta-hydroxybutyrate recovery was 97.0% and 90.7% when the ketone body ratios were 6:1 and 3:1, respectively. CONCLUSION. The analytical performance of the sensor, when operated according to manufacturer's instructions, could meet the needs of point-of-care beta-hydroxybutyrate measurement. Additional clinical studies are needed to assess the benefits of introducing such an assay in a clinical setting.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherHong Kong Medical Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkmj.org/resources/supp.htmlen_US
dc.relation.ispartofHong Kong medical journal = Xianggang yi xue za zhi / Hong Kong Academy of Medicineen_US
dc.subject.mesh3-Hydroxybutyric Acid - Blooden_US
dc.subject.meshAutoanalysis - Instrumentationen_US
dc.subject.meshBiosensing Techniques - Standardsen_US
dc.subject.meshComputer Peripheralsen_US
dc.subject.meshDiabetic Ketoacidosis - Diagnosisen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshPoint-Of-Care Systems - Standardsen_US
dc.titleEvaluation of a new handheld biosensor for point-of-care testing of whole blood beta-hydroxybutyrate concentration.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLam, CW:ching-wanlam@pathology.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLam, CW=rp00260en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid12055361-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0036597679en_US
dc.identifier.volume8en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage172en_US
dc.identifier.epage176en_US
dc.publisher.placeHong Kongen_US

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