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Article: Routine screening of (--SEA) α-thalassemia deletion by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for embryonic ζ-globin chains
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TitleRoutine screening of (--SEA) α-thalassemia deletion by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for embryonic ζ-globin chains
 
AuthorsMa, SK2
Ma, V2
Chan, AYY2
Chan, LC2
Chui, DHK1
 
Issue Date2002
 
PublisherS Karger AG. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.karger.com/AHA
 
CitationActa Haematologica, 2002, v. 108 n. 1, p. 8-12 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000063060
 
AbstractWe evaluated an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for embryonic ζ-globin chains as a routine screening test for (--SEA) α-thalassemia deletion (SEA deletion). A total of 174 consecutive patient samples with a request for Hb analysis were recruited. The ELISA method was evaluated against a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based technique that was taken as the standard. Among 56 simple carriers of SEA deletion diagnosed by PCR and 112 subjects without the SEA deletion, the sensitivity and specificity of the ELISA method was 89.3-96.4 and 98.2-100%, respectively, depending on the cutoff value for optical density that was adopted. The ELISA method was able to detect both subjects with SEA deletion and concurrent β-thalassemia trait in this series, but only 1 out of 4 patients (25%) with Hb H disease. We speculate that incomplete lysis of hypochromic microcytic red cells together with the low red cell count in Hb H disease might account for the false-negative results. We showed that the ELISA method for embryonic ζ-chains was a sensitive method of screening for SEA deletion carriers at our locality, and should be easily adopted in a routine diagnostic laboratory. The method was rapid and also amendable to automation. In areas with a high prevalence of α-thalassemia, improved detection of SEA deletion carriers would ultimately facilitate the identification of pregnancies at risk of hydrops fetalis and its prevention through prenatal diagnosis. Copyright © 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel.
 
ISSN0001-5792
2013 Impact Factor: 0.994
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000063060
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000177278300002
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorMa, SK
 
dc.contributor.authorMa, V
 
dc.contributor.authorChan, AYY
 
dc.contributor.authorChan, LC
 
dc.contributor.authorChui, DHK
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-29T06:11:59Z
 
dc.date.available2012-05-29T06:11:59Z
 
dc.date.issued2002
 
dc.description.abstractWe evaluated an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for embryonic ζ-globin chains as a routine screening test for (--SEA) α-thalassemia deletion (SEA deletion). A total of 174 consecutive patient samples with a request for Hb analysis were recruited. The ELISA method was evaluated against a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based technique that was taken as the standard. Among 56 simple carriers of SEA deletion diagnosed by PCR and 112 subjects without the SEA deletion, the sensitivity and specificity of the ELISA method was 89.3-96.4 and 98.2-100%, respectively, depending on the cutoff value for optical density that was adopted. The ELISA method was able to detect both subjects with SEA deletion and concurrent β-thalassemia trait in this series, but only 1 out of 4 patients (25%) with Hb H disease. We speculate that incomplete lysis of hypochromic microcytic red cells together with the low red cell count in Hb H disease might account for the false-negative results. We showed that the ELISA method for embryonic ζ-chains was a sensitive method of screening for SEA deletion carriers at our locality, and should be easily adopted in a routine diagnostic laboratory. The method was rapid and also amendable to automation. In areas with a high prevalence of α-thalassemia, improved detection of SEA deletion carriers would ultimately facilitate the identification of pregnancies at risk of hydrops fetalis and its prevention through prenatal diagnosis. Copyright © 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationActa Haematologica, 2002, v. 108 n. 1, p. 8-12 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000063060
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000063060
 
dc.identifier.epage12
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000177278300002
 
dc.identifier.issn0001-5792
2013 Impact Factor: 0.994
 
dc.identifier.issue1
 
dc.identifier.pmid12145460
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0036368152
 
dc.identifier.spage8
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/148283
 
dc.identifier.volume108
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherS Karger AG. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.karger.com/AHA
 
dc.publisher.placeSwitzerland
 
dc.relation.ispartofActa Haematologica
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshAdolescent
 
dc.subject.meshAdult
 
dc.subject.meshAged
 
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 And Over
 
dc.subject.meshAnemia, Hypochromic - Genetics
 
dc.subject.meshChild
 
dc.subject.meshComorbidity
 
dc.subject.meshEnzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
 
dc.subject.meshFemale
 
dc.subject.meshGlobins - Analysis - Genetics
 
dc.subject.meshHeterozygote Detection
 
dc.subject.meshHong Kong - Epidemiology
 
dc.subject.meshHumans
 
dc.subject.meshMale
 
dc.subject.meshMass Screening
 
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged
 
dc.subject.meshPolymerase Chain Reaction
 
dc.subject.meshPrevalence
 
dc.subject.meshSensitivity And Specificity
 
dc.subject.meshSequence Deletion
 
dc.subject.meshAlpha-Thalassemia - Blood - Epidemiology - Genetics
 
dc.subject.meshBeta-Thalassemia - Blood - Epidemiology - Genetics
 
dc.titleRoutine screening of (--SEA) α-thalassemia deletion by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for embryonic ζ-globin chains
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. McMaster University
  2. The University of Hong Kong