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Article: Transplacental chemical exposure and risk of infant leukemia with MLL gene fusion

TitleTransplacental chemical exposure and risk of infant leukemia with MLL gene fusion
Authors
Issue Date2001
PublisherAmerican Association for Cancer Research. The Journal's web site is located at http://cancerres.aacrjournals.org/
Citation
Cancer Research, 2001, v. 61 n. 6, p. 2542-2546 How to Cite?
AbstractInfant acute leukemia (IAL) frequently involves breakage and recombination of the MLL gene with one of several potential partner genes. These gene fusions arise in utero and are similar to those found in leukemias secondary to chemotherapy with inhibitors of topoisomerase II (topo-II). This has led to the hypothesis that in utero exposures to chemicals may cause IAL via an effect on topo-II. We report a pilot case-control study of IAL across different countries and ethnic groups. Cases (n = 136) were population-based in most centers. Controls (n = 266) were selected from inpatients and outpatients at hospitals serving the same populations. MLL rearrangement status was derived by Southern blot analysis, and maternal exposure data were obtained by interviews using a structured questionnaire. Apart from the use of cigarettes and alcohol, very few mothers reported exposure to known topo-II inhibitors. Significant case-control differences were apparent for ingestion of several groups of drugs, including herbal medicines and drugs classified as "DNA-damaging," and for exposure to pesticides with the last two being largely attributable, respectively, to one nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, dipyrone, and mosquitocidals (including Baygon). Elevated odds ratios were observed for MLL +ve (but not MLL -ve) leukemias (2.31 for DNA-damaging drugs, P = 0.03; 5.84 for dipyrone, P = 0.001; and 9.68 for mosquitocidals, P = 0.003). Although it is unclear at present whether these particular exposures operate via an effect on topo-II, the data suggest that specific chemical exposures of the fetus during pregnancy may cause MLL gene fusions. Given the widespread use of dipyrone, Baygon, and other carbamate-based insecticides in certain settings, confirmation of these apparent associations is urgently required.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/148263
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 8.556
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 5.372
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorAlexander, FEen_US
dc.contributor.authorPatheal, SLen_US
dc.contributor.authorBiondi, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorBrandalise, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorCabrera, MEen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, LCen_US
dc.contributor.authorChen, Zen_US
dc.contributor.authorCimino, Gen_US
dc.contributor.authorCordoba, JCen_US
dc.contributor.authorGu, LJen_US
dc.contributor.authorHussein, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorIshii, Een_US
dc.contributor.authorKamel, AMen_US
dc.contributor.authorLabra, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorMagalhães, IQen_US
dc.contributor.authorMizutani, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorPetridou, Een_US
dc.contributor.authorDe Oliveira, MPen_US
dc.contributor.authorYuen, Pen_US
dc.contributor.authorWiemels, JLen_US
dc.contributor.authorGreaves, MFen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-29T06:11:52Z-
dc.date.available2012-05-29T06:11:52Z-
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.identifier.citationCancer Research, 2001, v. 61 n. 6, p. 2542-2546en_US
dc.identifier.issn0008-5472en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/148263-
dc.description.abstractInfant acute leukemia (IAL) frequently involves breakage and recombination of the MLL gene with one of several potential partner genes. These gene fusions arise in utero and are similar to those found in leukemias secondary to chemotherapy with inhibitors of topoisomerase II (topo-II). This has led to the hypothesis that in utero exposures to chemicals may cause IAL via an effect on topo-II. We report a pilot case-control study of IAL across different countries and ethnic groups. Cases (n = 136) were population-based in most centers. Controls (n = 266) were selected from inpatients and outpatients at hospitals serving the same populations. MLL rearrangement status was derived by Southern blot analysis, and maternal exposure data were obtained by interviews using a structured questionnaire. Apart from the use of cigarettes and alcohol, very few mothers reported exposure to known topo-II inhibitors. Significant case-control differences were apparent for ingestion of several groups of drugs, including herbal medicines and drugs classified as "DNA-damaging," and for exposure to pesticides with the last two being largely attributable, respectively, to one nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, dipyrone, and mosquitocidals (including Baygon). Elevated odds ratios were observed for MLL +ve (but not MLL -ve) leukemias (2.31 for DNA-damaging drugs, P = 0.03; 5.84 for dipyrone, P = 0.001; and 9.68 for mosquitocidals, P = 0.003). Although it is unclear at present whether these particular exposures operate via an effect on topo-II, the data suggest that specific chemical exposures of the fetus during pregnancy may cause MLL gene fusions. Given the widespread use of dipyrone, Baygon, and other carbamate-based insecticides in certain settings, confirmation of these apparent associations is urgently required.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Association for Cancer Research. The Journal's web site is located at http://cancerres.aacrjournals.org/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofCancer Researchen_US
dc.subject.meshAcute Diseaseen_US
dc.subject.meshArtificial Gene Fusionen_US
dc.subject.meshCase-Control Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshDna-Binding Proteins - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshEnzyme Inhibitors - Adverse Effects - Pharmacokineticsen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshInfanten_US
dc.subject.meshInfant, Newbornen_US
dc.subject.meshLeukemia, Myeloid - Chemically Induced - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMaternal-Fetal Exchangeen_US
dc.subject.meshMyeloid-Lymphoid Leukemia Proteinen_US
dc.subject.meshPilot Projectsen_US
dc.subject.meshPrecursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma - Chemically Induced - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshPregnancyen_US
dc.subject.meshPrenatal Exposure Delayed Effectsen_US
dc.subject.meshProto-Oncogenesen_US
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshTopoisomerase Ii Inhibitorsen_US
dc.subject.meshTranscription Factorsen_US
dc.titleTransplacental chemical exposure and risk of infant leukemia with MLL gene fusionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, LC:chanlc@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChan, LC=rp00373en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid11289128-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0035866811en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0035866811&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume61en_US
dc.identifier.issue6en_US
dc.identifier.spage2542en_US
dc.identifier.epage2546en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000167697500035-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US

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