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Article: Malignant lymphoma of the thyroid: a 30-year clinicopathologic experience and an evaluation of the presence of Epstein-Barr virus

TitleMalignant lymphoma of the thyroid: a 30-year clinicopathologic experience and an evaluation of the presence of Epstein-Barr virus
Authors
KeywordsEpstein-Barr virus
Lymphoma
Thyroid
Issue Date1999
PublisherAmerican Society for Clinical Pathology. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.ajcp.com
Citation
American Journal of Clinical Pathology, 1999, v. 112 n. 2, p. 263-270 How to Cite?
AbstractLymphoma of thyroid is uncommon, and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is found in many lymphomas. We studied the clinicopathologic characteristics in Hong Kong Chinese and analyzed the presence of EBV in thyroid lymphomas by reviewing data collected during 3 decades. We studied EBV gene expression by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. Primary thyroid lymphomas were found in 23 patients (diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, 18; marginal zone B-cell lymphoma, 4; plasmacytoma, 1), and secondary lymphomas were found in 9 patients (diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, 3; Burkitt lymphomas, 2; Burkitt- like lymphoma, 1; hairy, cell leukemia, 1; nasal T-cell and natural killer cell lymphoma, 1; and intestinal T-cell lymphoma, 1). Primary thyroid lymphomas were large (mean, 7 cm), found commonly in older women, and often misdiagnosed as undifferentiated carcinomas. Fine-needle aspiration was not helpful for diagnosis. Fifteen patients had Hashimoto thyroiditis. A history of thyrotoxicosis was found in 3 patients, and coexistence of 3 diseases (papillary microcarcinomas, primary thyroid lymphoma, and Hashimoto thyroiditis) was found 4 patients. The 5-year survival rate for primary thyroid lymphoma was 53%. Combined surgery and radiotherapy seemed to be the best treatment. Secondary thyroid lymphomas often were asymptomatic. EBV messenger RNAs were detected in 1 primary and 1 secondary thyroid lymphoma. The EBV gene expression in primary thyroid lymphoma showed a type II latency pattern. Thyroid lymphomas in Chinese had important clinicopathologic features. EBV may have a role in a subset of cases.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/148176
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.278
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.129
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLam, KYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLo, CYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKwong, DLWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLee, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSrivastava, Gen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-29T06:11:15Z-
dc.date.available2012-05-29T06:11:15Z-
dc.date.issued1999en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Journal of Clinical Pathology, 1999, v. 112 n. 2, p. 263-270en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0002-9173en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/148176-
dc.description.abstractLymphoma of thyroid is uncommon, and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is found in many lymphomas. We studied the clinicopathologic characteristics in Hong Kong Chinese and analyzed the presence of EBV in thyroid lymphomas by reviewing data collected during 3 decades. We studied EBV gene expression by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. Primary thyroid lymphomas were found in 23 patients (diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, 18; marginal zone B-cell lymphoma, 4; plasmacytoma, 1), and secondary lymphomas were found in 9 patients (diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, 3; Burkitt lymphomas, 2; Burkitt- like lymphoma, 1; hairy, cell leukemia, 1; nasal T-cell and natural killer cell lymphoma, 1; and intestinal T-cell lymphoma, 1). Primary thyroid lymphomas were large (mean, 7 cm), found commonly in older women, and often misdiagnosed as undifferentiated carcinomas. Fine-needle aspiration was not helpful for diagnosis. Fifteen patients had Hashimoto thyroiditis. A history of thyrotoxicosis was found in 3 patients, and coexistence of 3 diseases (papillary microcarcinomas, primary thyroid lymphoma, and Hashimoto thyroiditis) was found 4 patients. The 5-year survival rate for primary thyroid lymphoma was 53%. Combined surgery and radiotherapy seemed to be the best treatment. Secondary thyroid lymphomas often were asymptomatic. EBV messenger RNAs were detected in 1 primary and 1 secondary thyroid lymphoma. The EBV gene expression in primary thyroid lymphoma showed a type II latency pattern. Thyroid lymphomas in Chinese had important clinicopathologic features. EBV may have a role in a subset of cases.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Society for Clinical Pathology. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.ajcp.comen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican Journal of Clinical Pathologyen_HK
dc.subjectEpstein-Barr virusen_HK
dc.subjectLymphomaen_HK
dc.subjectThyroiden_HK
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 And Overen_US
dc.subject.meshAntigens, Viral - Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshCarcinoma, Papillary - Pathology - Virologyen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHerpesviridae Infections - Complications - Pathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHerpesvirus 4, Human - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshImmunoenzyme Techniquesen_US
dc.subject.meshIn Situ Hybridizationen_US
dc.subject.meshLymphoma, B-Cell - Pathology - Virologyen_US
dc.subject.meshLymphoma, Non-Hodgkin - Pathology - Virologyen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshRna, Messenger - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshRna, Viral - Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshThyroid Neoplasms - Pathology - Virologyen_US
dc.subject.meshThyroiditis, Autoimmune - Pathology - Virologyen_US
dc.subject.meshTumor Virus Infections - Complications - Pathologyen_US
dc.titleMalignant lymphoma of the thyroid: a 30-year clinicopathologic experience and an evaluation of the presence of Epstein-Barr virusen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, AKY: akylam@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLo, CY: cylo@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailKwong, DLW: dlwkwong@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLee, JSK: jsklee@HKUCC.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailSrivastava, G: gopesh@pathology.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityKwong, DLW=rp00414en_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySrivastava, G=rp00365en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid10439808-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0033491255en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros51299-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0033491255&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume112en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage263en_HK
dc.identifier.epage270en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000081664800015-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, KY=7403657165en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLo, CY=16417392800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKwong, DLW=15744231600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, J=36065603500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSrivastava, G=7202242238en_HK
dc.customcontrol.immutablesml 130621-

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