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Article: Cytogenetics and molecular genetics of childhood leukemia

TitleCytogenetics and molecular genetics of childhood leukemia
Authors
Issue Date1999
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/3182
Citation
Hematological Oncology, 1999, v. 17 n. 3, p. 91-105 How to Cite?
AbstractChildhood leukemia is the commonest form of childhood cancer and represents clonal proliferation of transformed hemopoietic cells as a result of genetic changes. Molecular characterization of these changes, in particular chromosomal translocations, has yielded a wealth of information on the mechanisms of leukemogenesis. These findings have also allowed the development of sensitive assays for the identification of underlying molecular defects, which is applicable to disease diagnosis and to monitor response to treatment. Genetic alterations in childhood leukemia are powerful prognostic indicators. TEL-AML1 fusion and hyperdiploidy >50 chromosomes are associated with a good prognosis in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia, whereas BCR-ABL fusion and MLL rearrangements are associated with a poor prognosis. Hence cytogenetic and molecular genetic classification of childhood leukemia will significantly improve the ability of clinicians to predict therapeutic response and prognosis, which paves the way for risk stratification based on clinical and genetic features. Finally, deciphering of genetic lesions in leukemia has allowed elucidation of the molecular basis of current treatment, as typified by the success of all-trans retinoic treatment in acute promyelocytic leukemia, and has identified targets for novel therapeutic approaches. It is envisaged that efforts in characterization of molecular defects in childhood leukemia will ultimately be translated into better clinical outcome for patients. Copyright (C) 1999 John Wiley and Sons, Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/148173
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.494
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.767
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMa, SKen_US
dc.contributor.authorWan, TSKen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, LCen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-29T06:11:14Z-
dc.date.available2012-05-29T06:11:14Z-
dc.date.issued1999en_US
dc.identifier.citationHematological Oncology, 1999, v. 17 n. 3, p. 91-105en_US
dc.identifier.issn0278-0232en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/148173-
dc.description.abstractChildhood leukemia is the commonest form of childhood cancer and represents clonal proliferation of transformed hemopoietic cells as a result of genetic changes. Molecular characterization of these changes, in particular chromosomal translocations, has yielded a wealth of information on the mechanisms of leukemogenesis. These findings have also allowed the development of sensitive assays for the identification of underlying molecular defects, which is applicable to disease diagnosis and to monitor response to treatment. Genetic alterations in childhood leukemia are powerful prognostic indicators. TEL-AML1 fusion and hyperdiploidy >50 chromosomes are associated with a good prognosis in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia, whereas BCR-ABL fusion and MLL rearrangements are associated with a poor prognosis. Hence cytogenetic and molecular genetic classification of childhood leukemia will significantly improve the ability of clinicians to predict therapeutic response and prognosis, which paves the way for risk stratification based on clinical and genetic features. Finally, deciphering of genetic lesions in leukemia has allowed elucidation of the molecular basis of current treatment, as typified by the success of all-trans retinoic treatment in acute promyelocytic leukemia, and has identified targets for novel therapeutic approaches. It is envisaged that efforts in characterization of molecular defects in childhood leukemia will ultimately be translated into better clinical outcome for patients. Copyright (C) 1999 John Wiley and Sons, Ltd.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/3182en_US
dc.relation.ispartofHematological Oncologyen_US
dc.subject.meshChilden_US
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen_US
dc.subject.meshChromosome Aberrations - Classificationen_US
dc.subject.meshChromosome Disordersen_US
dc.subject.meshGene Rearrangementen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshIn Situ Hybridization, Fluorescenceen_US
dc.subject.meshLeukemia - Diagnosis - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshPrognosisen_US
dc.subject.meshRecombinant Fusion Proteins - Genetics - Isolation & Purificationen_US
dc.subject.meshReverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reactionen_US
dc.subject.meshTranslocation, Geneticen_US
dc.subject.meshTumor Markers, Biological - Geneticsen_US
dc.titleCytogenetics and molecular genetics of childhood leukemiaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, LC:chanlc@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChan, LC=rp00373en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/(SICI)1099-1069(199909)17:3<91::AID-HON643>3.0.CO;2-Yen_US
dc.identifier.pmid10641030-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0033397647en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0033397647&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume17en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage91en_US
dc.identifier.epage105en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000085252900001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US

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