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Article: Epstein-Barr virus infection is associated with p53 accumulation in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

TitleEpstein-Barr virus infection is associated with p53 accumulation in nasopharyngeal carcinoma
Authors
Issue Date1998
PublisherWB Saunders Co. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/humpath
Citation
Human Pathology, 1998, v. 29 n. 3, p. 252-259 How to Cite?
AbstractEighty-three cases of nasopharyngeal carcinoma were evaluated for the presence of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in tumor cells by in situ hybridization to EBER1 transcripts, and for p53 expression by immunostains using the D07 antibody which detects native and mutant forms of the p53 protein. A highly significant association was found between EBV infection and p53 overexpression (P = .0004), with 77% of cases coexpressing both markers. This newly discovered association suggests that EBV is not an innocent bystander with respect to p53 accumulation. One possible mediator of the interaction between EBV and p53, viral BZLF1, was not colocalized with p53 in these tumors, suggesting that BZLF1 is not the factor responsible for p53 accumulation. From an epidemiological standpoint, this series of cancers represents an international cohort in which cases from an endemic part of the world (Hong Kong) were examined alongside cases from the United States, where the disease is 50-fold less prevalent. The cancers from Hong Kong tended to be less differentiated and more frequently associated with EBV, suggesting that biological differences might underlie epidemiological variations in tumor prevalence. Finally, we examined 18 potential premalignant lesions of the surface epithelium of the nasopharynx. Although our numbers are small, our data suggest that p53 accumulation might precede EBV infection in the transition from metaplasia to carcinoma in situ. Further studies are needed to dissect the stepwise progression of nopharyngeal carcinogenesis.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/148119
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.791
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.363
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGulley, MLen_US
dc.contributor.authorBurton, MPen_US
dc.contributor.authorAllred, DCen_US
dc.contributor.authorNicholls, JMen_US
dc.contributor.authorAmin, MBen_US
dc.contributor.authorRo, JYen_US
dc.contributor.authorSchneider, BGen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-29T06:10:57Z-
dc.date.available2012-05-29T06:10:57Z-
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.identifier.citationHuman Pathology, 1998, v. 29 n. 3, p. 252-259en_US
dc.identifier.issn0046-8177en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/148119-
dc.description.abstractEighty-three cases of nasopharyngeal carcinoma were evaluated for the presence of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in tumor cells by in situ hybridization to EBER1 transcripts, and for p53 expression by immunostains using the D07 antibody which detects native and mutant forms of the p53 protein. A highly significant association was found between EBV infection and p53 overexpression (P = .0004), with 77% of cases coexpressing both markers. This newly discovered association suggests that EBV is not an innocent bystander with respect to p53 accumulation. One possible mediator of the interaction between EBV and p53, viral BZLF1, was not colocalized with p53 in these tumors, suggesting that BZLF1 is not the factor responsible for p53 accumulation. From an epidemiological standpoint, this series of cancers represents an international cohort in which cases from an endemic part of the world (Hong Kong) were examined alongside cases from the United States, where the disease is 50-fold less prevalent. The cancers from Hong Kong tended to be less differentiated and more frequently associated with EBV, suggesting that biological differences might underlie epidemiological variations in tumor prevalence. Finally, we examined 18 potential premalignant lesions of the surface epithelium of the nasopharynx. Although our numbers are small, our data suggest that p53 accumulation might precede EBV infection in the transition from metaplasia to carcinoma in situ. Further studies are needed to dissect the stepwise progression of nopharyngeal carcinogenesis.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherWB Saunders Co. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/humpathen_US
dc.relation.ispartofHuman Pathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshCarcinoma In Situ - Metabolism - Pathology - Virologyen_US
dc.subject.meshCarcinoma, Squamous Cell - Metabolism - Pathology - Virologyen_US
dc.subject.meshDna-Binding Proteins - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshEpithelium - Pathology - Virologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHerpesviridae Infections - Metabolism - Pathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHerpesvirus 4, Human - Isolation & Purificationen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshImmunohistochemistryen_US
dc.subject.meshIn Situ Hybridizationen_US
dc.subject.meshNasopharyngeal Neoplasms - Metabolism - Pathology - Virologyen_US
dc.subject.meshNasopharynx - Pathology - Virologyen_US
dc.subject.meshRna, Viral - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshTrans-Activators - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshTumor Suppressor Protein P53 - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshTumor Virus Infections - Metabolism - Pathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshViral Proteinsen_US
dc.titleEpstein-Barr virus infection is associated with p53 accumulation in nasopharyngeal carcinomaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailNicholls, JM:nicholls@pathology.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityNicholls, JM=rp00364en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0046-8177(98)90044-2en_US
dc.identifier.pmid9496828-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0031939038en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0031939038&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume29en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage252en_US
dc.identifier.epage259en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000072270900009-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US

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