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Article: Laser spectroscopy of FeO: Rotational analysis of some subbands of the orange system

TitleLaser spectroscopy of FeO: Rotational analysis of some subbands of the orange system
Authors
Issue Date1983
PublisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/yjmsp
Citation
Journal Of Molecular Spectroscopy, 1983, v. 102 n. 1, p. 224-257 How to Cite?
AbstractExtensive laser excitation spectra and rotationally resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectra have been recorded for the "orange system" of gaseous FeO in the wavelength regions 5790-6140 and 5580-5640 Å. Detailed rotational analyses have been performed for about 20 Ω′ substates lying between 16 350 and 18 550 cm -1. These are found to comprise a very severely perturbed 5Δ i excited electronic state with a bond length of about 1.69 Å (which is responsible for the parallel polarization of the electronic transition from the 5Δ i ground electronic state) and a large number of "extra" Ω substates with B′ values ranging from 0.38 to 0.50 cm -1, which almost certainly belong to high vibrational levels of lower-lying electronic states. Evidence about the natures of the "extra" states is confusing, however, with the 54FeO 56FeO isotope shifts apparently being in conflict with the patterns of vibrationally resolved laser-induced fluorescence. Every single Ω substate that has been analyzed shows rotational perturbations of varying severity. The density and magnitude of the rotational perturbations are quite exceptional for a diatomic molecule, and result in a new type of totally chaotic diatomic spectrum. There is a remarkable similarity to the visible spectrum of NO 2: in NO 2 the complications arise from the high density of perturbing ground state vibrational levels; in FeO there is a correspondingly high density of perturbing electronic states at lower energy. The great complexity of the FeO spectrum arises because the states are in an awkward intermediate spin-coupling case which still resembles Hund's case (a) but shows strong tendencies toward Hund's case (c) coupling. © 1983.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/147702
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.593
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.543
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheung, ASCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLyyra, AMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMerer, AJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, AWen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-29T06:08:47Z-
dc.date.available2012-05-29T06:08:47Z-
dc.date.issued1983en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Molecular Spectroscopy, 1983, v. 102 n. 1, p. 224-257en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0022-2852en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/147702-
dc.description.abstractExtensive laser excitation spectra and rotationally resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectra have been recorded for the "orange system" of gaseous FeO in the wavelength regions 5790-6140 and 5580-5640 Å. Detailed rotational analyses have been performed for about 20 Ω′ substates lying between 16 350 and 18 550 cm -1. These are found to comprise a very severely perturbed 5Δ i excited electronic state with a bond length of about 1.69 Å (which is responsible for the parallel polarization of the electronic transition from the 5Δ i ground electronic state) and a large number of "extra" Ω substates with B′ values ranging from 0.38 to 0.50 cm -1, which almost certainly belong to high vibrational levels of lower-lying electronic states. Evidence about the natures of the "extra" states is confusing, however, with the 54FeO 56FeO isotope shifts apparently being in conflict with the patterns of vibrationally resolved laser-induced fluorescence. Every single Ω substate that has been analyzed shows rotational perturbations of varying severity. The density and magnitude of the rotational perturbations are quite exceptional for a diatomic molecule, and result in a new type of totally chaotic diatomic spectrum. There is a remarkable similarity to the visible spectrum of NO 2: in NO 2 the complications arise from the high density of perturbing ground state vibrational levels; in FeO there is a correspondingly high density of perturbing electronic states at lower energy. The great complexity of the FeO spectrum arises because the states are in an awkward intermediate spin-coupling case which still resembles Hund's case (a) but shows strong tendencies toward Hund's case (c) coupling. © 1983.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/yjmspen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Molecular Spectroscopyen_HK
dc.titleLaser spectroscopy of FeO: Rotational analysis of some subbands of the orange systemen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailCheung, ASC:hrsccsc@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, ASC=rp00676en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/0022-2852(83)90240-0-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0000686402en_HK
dc.identifier.volume102en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage224en_HK
dc.identifier.epage257en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1983RS85000018-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, ASC=7401806538en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLyyra, AM=7003369998en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMerer, AJ=6603864922en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTaylor, AW=24406894300en_HK

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